How to Create a Testnet Wallet – BitPay Support

Yea green address testnet wallet works as a spv /r/Bitcoin

Yea green address testnet wallet works as a spv /Bitcoin submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

I'm using the Lighning Network enabled Eclair Wallet on Android and I want to send you some testnet coins! Post your wallet address and receive some coins ~instantly~! :) /r/Bitcoin

I'm using the Lighning Network enabled Eclair Wallet on Android and I want to send you some testnet coins! Post your wallet address and receive some coins ~instantly~! :) /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

07-26 21:32 - 'I'm using the Lighning Network enabled Eclair Wallet on Android and I want to send you some testnet coins! Post your wallet address and receive some coins ~instantly~! :)' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/sirkloda removed from /r/Bitcoin within 611-621min

'''
Lightning oh yes!
'''
I'm using the Lighning Network enabled Eclair Wallet on Android and I want to send you some testnet coins! Post your wallet address and receive some coins ~instantly~! :)
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: sirkloda
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

A Detailed Summary of Every Single Reason Why I am Bullish on Ethereum

The following will be a list of the many reasons why I hold and am extremely bullish on ETH.

This is an extremely long post. If you just want the hopium without the detail, read the TL;DR at the bottom.

ETH 2.0

As we all know, ETH 2.0 phase 0 is right around the corner. This will lock up ETH and stakers will earn interest on their ETH in return for securing the network. Next comes phase 1 where the ETH 2 shards are introduced, shards are essentially parallel blockchains which are each responsible for a different part of Ethereum’s workload, think of it like a multi-core processor vs a single core processor. During phase 1, these shards will only act as data availability layers and won’t actually process transactions yet. However, their data can be utilised by the L2 scaling solution, rollups, increasing Ethereum’s throughput in transactions per second up to 100,000 TPS.
After phase 1 comes phase 1.5 which will move the ETH 1.0 chain into an ETH 2 shard and Ethereum will be fully secured by proof of stake. This means that ETH issuance will drop from around 5% per year to less than 1% and with EIP-1559, ETH might become a deflationary asset, but more on that later.
Finally, with ETH 2.0 phase two, each shard will be fully functional chains. With 64 of them, we can expect the base layer of Ethereum to scale around 64x, not including the massive scaling which comes from layer 2 scaling solutions like rollups as previously mentioned.
While the scaling benefits and ETH issuance reduction which comes with ETH 2.0 will be massive, they aren’t the only benefits. We also get benefits such as increased security from PoS compared to PoW, a huge energy efficiency improvement due to the removal of PoW and also the addition of eWASM which will allow contracts to be programmed in a wide range of programming languages, opening the floodgates for millions of web devs who want to be involved in Ethereum but don’t know Ethereum’s programming language, Solidity.

EIP-1559 and ETH scarcity

As I covered in a previous post of mine, ETH doesn’t have a supply cap like Bitcoin. Instead, it has a monetary policy of “minimum viable issuance”, not only is this is a good thing for network security, but with the addition of EIP-1559, it leaves the door open to the possibility of ETH issuance going negative. In short, EIP-1559 changes the fee market to make transaction prices more efficient (helping to alleviate high gas fees!) by burning a variable base fee which changes based on network usage demand rather than using a highest bidder market where miners simply include who pays them the most. This will result in most of the ETH being paid in transaction fees being burned. As of late, the amount which would be burned if EIP-1559 was in Ethereum right now would make ETH a deflationary asset!

Layer 2 Scaling

In the mean time while we are waiting for ETH 2.0, layer 2 scaling is here. Right now, projects such as Deversifi or Loopring utilise rollups to scale to thousands of tx/s on their decentralised exchange platforms or HoneySwap which uses xDai to offer a more scalable alternative to UniSwap. Speaking of which, big DeFi players like UniSwap and Synthetix are actively looking into using optimistic rollups to scale while maintaining composability between DeFi platforms. The most bullish thing about L2 scaling is all of the variety of options. Here’s a non exhaustive list of Ethereum L2 scaling solutions: - Aztec protocol (L2 scaling + privacy!) - ZKSync - Loopring - Raiden - Arbitrum Rollups - xDai - OMGNetwork - Matic - FuelLabs - Starkware - Optimism - Celer Network - + Many more

DeFi and Composability

If you’re reading this, I am sure you are aware of the phenomena which is Decentralised Finance (DeFi or more accurately, open finance). Ethereum is the first platform to offer permissionless and immutable financial services which when interacting with each other, lead to unprecedented composability and innovation in financial applications. A whole new world of possibilities are opening up thanks to this composability as it allows anyone to take existing pieces of open source code from other DeFi projects, put them together like lego pieces (hence the term money legos) and create something the world has never seen before. None of this was possible before Ethereum because typically financial services are heavily regulated and FinTech is usually proprietary software, so you don’t have any open source lego bricks to build off and you have to build everything you need from scratch. That is if what you want to do is even legal for a centralised institution!
Oh, and if you think that DeFi was just a fad and the bubble has popped, guess again! Total value locked in DeFi is currently at an all time high. Don’t believe me? Find out for yourself on the DeFi Pulse website.

NFTs and tokeniation

NFTs or “Non-Fungible Tokens” - despite the name which may confuse a layman - are a basic concept. They are unique tokens with their own unique attributes. This allows you to create digital art, human readable names for your ETH address (see ENS names and unstoppable domains), breedable virtual collectible creatures like crypto kitties, ownable in game assets like Gods Unchained cards or best of all in my opinion, tokenised ownership of real world assets which can even be split into pieces (this doesn’t necessarily require an NFT. Fungible tokens can be/are used for some of the following use cases). This could be tokenised ownership of real estate (see RealT), tokenised ownership of stocks, bonds and other financial assets (which by the way makes them tradable 24/7 and divisible unlike through the traditional system) or even tokenised ownership of the future income of a celebrity or athlete (see when NBA player Spencer Dinwiddie tokenized his own NBA contract.)

Institutional Adoption

Ethereum is by far the most widely adopted blockchain by enterprises. Ethereum’s Enterprise Ethereum Alliance (EEA) is the largest blockchain-enterprise partnership program and Ethereum is by far the most frequently leveraged blockchain for proof of concepts and innovation in the blockchain space by enterprises. Meanwhile, there are protocols like the Baseline protocol which is a shared framework which allows enterprises to use Ethereum as a common frame of reference and a base settlement layer without having to give up privacy when settling on the public Ethereum mainnet. This framework makes adopting Ethereum much easier for other enterprises.

Institutional Investment

One of Bitcoin’s biggest things it has going for it right now is the growing institutional investment. In case you were wondering, Ethereum has this too! Grayscale offers investment in the cryptocurrency space for financial institutions and their Ethereum fund has already locked up more than 2% of the total supply of ETH. Not only this, but as businesses transact on Ethereum and better understand it, not only will they buy up ETH to pay for their transactions, but they will also realise that much like Bitcoin, Ethereum is a scarce asset. Better yet, a scarce asset which offers yield. As a result, I expect to see companies having ETH holdings become the norm just like how Bitcoin is becoming more widespread on companies’ balance sheets.

The state of global markets

With asset prices in almost every asset class at or near all-time highs and interest rates lower than ever and even negative in some cases, there really aren’t many good opportunities in the traditional financial system right now. Enter crypto - clearly the next evolution of financial services (as I explained in the section on DeFi earlier in this post), with scarce assets built in at the protocol layer, buying BTC or ETH is a lot like buying shares in TCP/IP in 1990 (that is if the underlying protocols of the internet could be invested in which they couldn’t). Best of all, major cryptos are down from their all-time highs anywhere between 35% for BTC or 70% for ETH and much more for many altcoins. This means that they can significantly appreciate in value before entering uncharted, speculative bubble territory.
While of course we could fall dramatically at any moment in the current macro financial conditions, as a longer term play, crypto is very alluring. The existing financial system has shown that it is in dire need of replacing and the potential replacement has started rearing its head in the form of crypto and DeFi.

Improvements in user onboarding and abstracting away complexity

Ethereum has started making huge leaps forward in terms of usability for the end user. We now have ENS names and unstoppable domains which allow you to send ETH to yournamehere.ETH or TrickyTroll.crypto (I don’t actually have that domain, that’s just an example). No longer do you have to check every character of your ugly hexadecimal 0x43AB96D… ETH address to ensure you’re sending your ETH to the right person. We also have smart contract wallets like Argent wallet or the Gnosis safe. These allow for users to access their wallets and interact with DeFi self-custodially from an app on their phone without having to record a private key or recovery phrase. Instead, they offer social recovery and their UI is straight forward enough for anyone who uses a smart phone to understand. Finally, for the more experienced users, DApps like Uniswap have pretty, super easy to use graphical user interfaces and can be used by anyone who knows how to run and use a browser extension like Metamask.

The lack of an obvious #1 ETH killer

One of Ethereum’s biggest threats is for it to be overthrown by a so-called “Ethereum killer” blockchain which claims to do everything Ethereum can do and sometimes more. While there are competitors which are each formidable to a certain extent such as Polkadot, Cardano and EOS, each have their own weaknesses. For example, Polkadot and Cardano are not fully operational yet and EOS is much more centralised than Ethereum. As a result, none of these competitors have any significant network effects just yet relative to the behemoth which is Ethereum. This doesn’t mean that these projects aren’t a threat. In fact, I am sure that projects like Polkadot (which is more focused on complimenting Ethereum than killing it) will take a slice out of Ethereum’s pie. However, I am still very confident that Ethereum will remain on top due to the lack of a clear number 2 smart contract platform. Since none of these ETH killers stands out as the second place smart contract platform, it makes it much harder for one project to create a network effect which even begins to threaten Ethereum’s dominance. This leads me onto my next reason - network effects.

Network effects

This is another topic which I made a previous post on. The network effect is why Bitcoin is still the number one cryptocurrency and by such a long way. Bitcoin is not the most technologically advanced cryptocurrency. However, it has the most widespread name recognition and the most adoption in most metrics (ETH beats in in some metrics these days). The network effect is also why most people use Zoom and Facebook messengeWhatsApp despite the existence of free, private, end to end encrypted alternatives which have all the same features (Jitsi for the zoom alternative and Signal for the private messenger app. I highly recommend both. Let’s get their network effects going!). It is the same for Bitcoin. People don’t want to have to learn about or set up a wallet for alternative options. People like what is familiar and what other people use. Nobody wants to be “that guy” who makes you download yet another app and account you have to remember the password/private key for. In the same way, Enterprises don’t want to have to create a bridge between their existing systems and a dozen different blockchains. Developers don’t want to have to create DeFi money legos from scratch on a new chain if they can just plug in to existing services like Uniswap. Likewise, users don’t want to have to download another browser extension to use DApps on another chain if they already use Ethereum. I know personally I have refrained from investing in altcoins because I would have to install another app on my hardware wallet or remember another recovery phrase.
Overthrowing Ethereum’s network effect is one hell of a big task these days. Time is running out for the ETH killers.

Ethereum is the most decentralised and provably neutral smart contract platform

Ethereum is also arguably the most decentralised and provably neutral smart contract platform (except for maybe Ethereum Classic on the neutrality part). Unlike some smart contract platforms, you can’t round up everyone at the Ethereum Foundation or any select group of people and expect to be able to stop the network. Not only this, but the Ethereum foundation doesn’t have the ability to print more ETH or push through changes as they wish like some people would lead you on to believe. The community would reject detrimental EIPs and hard fork. Ever since the DAO hack, the Ethereum community has made it clear that it will not accept EIPs which attempt to roll back the chain even to recover hacked funds (see EIP-999).
Even if governments around the world wanted to censor the Ethereum blockchain, under ETH 2.0’s proof of stake, it would be incredibly costly and would require a double digit percentage of the total ETH supply, much of which would be slashed (meaning they would lose it) as punishment for running dishonest validator nodes. This means that unlike with proof of work where a 51% attacker can keep attacking the network, under proof of stake, an attacker can only perform the attack a couple of times before they lose all of their ETH. This makes attacks much less financially viable than it is on proof of work chains. Network security is much more than what I laid out above and I am far from an expert but the improved resistance to 51% attacks which PoS provides is significant.
Finally, with the US dollar looking like it will lose its reserve currency status and the existing wire transfer system being outdated, superpowers like China won’t want to use US systems and the US won’t want to use a Chinese system. Enter Ethereum, the provably neutral settlement layer where the USA and China don’t have to trust each other or each other’s banks because they can trust Ethereum. While it may sound like a long shot, it does make sense if Ethereum hits a multi-trillion dollar market cap that it is the most secure and neutral way to transfer value between these adversaries. Not to mention if much of the world’s commerce were to be settled in the same place - on Ethereum - then it would make sense for governments to settle on the same platform.

ETH distribution is decentralised

Thanks to over 5 years of proof of work - a system where miners have to sell newly minted ETH to pay for electricity costs - newly mined ETH has found its way into the hands of everyday people who buy ETH off miners selling on exchnages. As pointed out by u/AdamSC1 in his analysis of the top 10K ETH addresses (I highly recommend reading this if you haven’t already), the distribution of ETH is actually slightly more decentralised than Bitcoin with the top 10,000 ETH wallets holding 56.70% of ETH supply compared to the top 10,000 Bitcoin wallets which hold 57.44% of the Bitcoin supply. This decentralised distribution means that the introduction of staking won’t centralise ETH in the hands of a few wallets who could then control the network. This is an advantage for ETH which many proof of stake ETH killers will never have as they never used PoW to distribute funds widely throughout the community and these ETH killers often did funding rounds giving large numbers of tokens to VC investors.

The community

Finally, while I may be biased, I think that Ethereum has the friendliest community. Anecdotally, I find that the Ethereum developer community is full of forward thinking people who want to make the world a better place and build a better future, many of whom are altruistic and don’t always act in their best interests. Compare this to the much more conservative, “at least we’re safe while the world burns” attitude which many Bitcoiners have. I don’t want to generalise too much here as the Bitcoin community is great too and there are some wonderful people there. But the difference is clear if you compare the daily discussion of Bitcoin to the incredibly helpful and welcoming daily discussion of EthFinance who will happily answer your noob questions without calling you an idiot and telling you to do you own research (there are plenty more examples in any of the daily threads). Or the very helpful folks over at EthStaker who will go out of their way to help you set up an ETH 2.0 staking node on the testnets (Shoutout to u/superphiz who does a lot of work over in that sub!). Don’t believe me? Head over to those subs and see for yourself.
Please don’t hate on me if you disagree about which project has the best community, it is just my very biased personal opinion and I respect your opinion if you disagree! :)

TL;DR:

submitted by Tricky_Troll to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

A Detailed Summary of Every Single Reason Why I am Bullish on ETH.

The following will be a list of the many reasons why I hold and am extremely bullish on ETH.

This is an extremely long post. If you just want the hopium without the detail, read the TL;DR at the bottom.

ETH 2.0

As we all know, ETH 2.0 phase 0 is right around the corner. This will lock up ETH and stakers will earn interest on their ETH in return for securing the network. Next comes phase 1 where the ETH 2 shards are introduced, shards are essentially parallel blockchains which are each responsible for a different part of Ethereum’s workload, think of it like a multi-core processor vs a single core processor. During phase 1, these shards will only act as data availability layers and won’t actually process transactions yet. However, their data can be utilised by the L2 scaling solution, rollups, increasing Ethereum’s throughput in transactions per second up to 100,000 TPS.
After phase 1 comes phase 1.5 which will move the ETH 1.0 chain into an ETH 2 shard and Ethereum will be fully secured by proof of stake. This means that ETH issuance will drop from around 5% per year to less than 1% and with EIP-1559, ETH might become a deflationary asset, but more on that later.
Finally, with ETH 2.0 phase two, each shard will be fully functional chains. With 64 of them, we can expect the base layer of Ethereum to scale around 64x, not including the massive scaling which comes from layer 2 scaling solutions like rollups as previously mentioned.
While the scaling benefits and ETH issuance reduction which comes with ETH 2.0 will be massive, they aren’t the only benefits. We also get benefits such as increased security from PoS compared to PoW, a huge energy efficiency improvement due to the removal of PoW and also the addition of eWASM which will allow contracts to be programmed in a wide range of programming languages, opening the floodgates for millions of web devs who want to be involved in Ethereum but don’t know Ethereum’s programming language, Solidity.

EIP-1559 and ETH scarcity

As I covered in a previous post of mine, ETH doesn’t have a supply cap like Bitcoin. Instead, it has a monetary policy of “minimum viable issuance”, not only is this is a good thing for network security, but with the addition of EIP-1559, it leaves the door open to the possibility of ETH issuance going negative. In short, EIP-1559 changes the fee market to make transaction prices more efficient (helping to alleviate high gas fees!) by burning a variable base fee which changes based on network usage demand rather than using a highest bidder market where miners simply include who pays them the most. This will result in most of the ETH being paid in transaction fees being burned. As of late, the amount which would be burned if EIP-1559 was in Ethereum right now would make ETH a deflationary asset!

Layer 2 Scaling

In the mean time while we are waiting for ETH 2.0, layer 2 scaling is here. Right now, projects such as Deversifi or Loopring utilise rollups to scale to thousands of tx/s on their decentralised exchange platforms or HoneySwap which uses xDai to offer a more scalable alternative to UniSwap. Speaking of which, big DeFi players like UniSwap and Synthetix are actively looking into using optimistic rollups to scale while maintaining composability between DeFi platforms. The most bullish thing about L2 scaling is all of the variety of options. Here’s a non exhaustive list of Ethereum L2 scaling solutions: - Aztec protocol (L2 scaling + privacy!) - ZKSync - Loopring - Raiden - Arbitrum Rollups - xDai - OMGNetwork - Matic - FuelLabs - Starkware - Optimism - Celer Network - + Many more

DeFi and Composability

If you’re reading this, I am sure you are aware of the phenomena which is Decentralised Finance (DeFi or more accurately, open finance). Ethereum is the first platform to offer permissionless and immutable financial services which when interacting with each other, lead to unprecedented composability and innovation in financial applications. A whole new world of possibilities are opening up thanks to this composability as it allows anyone to take existing pieces of open source code from other DeFi projects, put them together like lego pieces (hence the term money legos) and create something the world has never seen before. None of this was possible before Ethereum because typically financial services are heavily regulated and FinTech is usually proprietary software, so you don’t have any open source lego bricks to build off and you have to build everything you need from scratch. That is if what you want to do is even legal for a centralised institution!
Oh, and if you think that DeFi was just a fad and the bubble has popped, guess again! Total value locked in DeFi is currently at an all time high. Don’t believe me? Find out for yourself at: https://defipulse.com

NFTs and tokeniation

NFTs or “Non-Fungible Tokens” - despite the name which may confuse a layman - are a basic concept. They are unique tokens with their own unique attributes. This allows you to create digital art, human readable names for your ETH address (see ENS names and unstoppable domains), breedable virtual collectible creatures like crypto kitties, ownable in game assets like Gods Unchained cards or best of all in my opinion, tokenised ownership of real world assets which can even be split into pieces (this doesn’t necessarily require an NFT. Fungible tokens can be/are used for some of the following use cases). This could be tokenised ownership of real estate (see RealT), tokenised ownership of stocks, bonds and other financial assets (which by the way makes them tradable 24/7 and divisible unlike through the traditional system) or even tokenised ownership of the future income of a celebrity or athlete (see when NBA Star Spencer Dinwiddie Tokenized His Own NBA Contract.

Institutional Adoption

Ethereum is by far the most widely adopted blockchain by enterprises. Ethereum’s Enterprise Ethereum Alliance (EEA) is the largest blockchain-enterprise partnership program and Ethereum is by far the most frequently leveraged blockchain for proof of concepts and innovation in the blockchain space by enterprises. Meanwhile, there are protocols like the Baseline protocol which is a shared framework which allows enterprises to use Ethereum as a common frame of reference and a base settlement layer without having to give up privacy when settling on the public Ethereum mainnet. This framework makes adopting Ethereum much easier for other enterprises.

Institutional Investment

One of Bitcoin’s biggest things it has going for it right now is the growing institutional investment. In case you were wondering, Ethereum has this too! Grayscale offers investment in the cryptocurrency space for financial institutions and their Ethereum fund has already locked up more than 2% of the total supply of ETH. Not only this, but as businesses transact on Ethereum and better understand it, not only will they buy up ETH to pay for their transactions, but they will also realise that much like Bitcoin, Ethereum is a scarce asset. Better yet, a scarce asset which offers yield. As a result, I expect to see companies having ETH holdings become the norm just like how Bitcoin is becoming more widespread on companies’ balance sheets.

The state of global markets

With asset prices in almost every asset class at or near all-time highs and interest rates lower than ever and even negative in some cases, there really aren’t many good opportunities in the traditional financial system right now. Enter crypto - clearly the next evolution of financial services (as I explained in the section on DeFi earlier in this post), with scarce assets built in at the protocol layer, buying BTC or ETH is a lot like buying shares in TCP/IP in 1990 (that is if the underlying protocols of the internet could be invested in which they couldn’t). Best of all, major cryptos are down from their all-time highs anywhere between 35% for BTC or 70% for ETH and much more for many altcoins. This means that they can significantly appreciate in value before entering uncharted, speculative bubble territory.
While of course we could fall dramatically at any moment in the current macro financial conditions, as a longer term play, crypto is very alluring. The existing financial system has shown that it is in dire need of replacing and the potential replacement has started rearing its head in the form of crypto and DeFi.

Improvements in user onboarding and abstracting away complexity

Ethereum has started making huge leaps forward in terms of usability for the end user. We now have ENS names and unstoppable domains which allow you to send ETH to yournamehere.ETH or TrickyTroll.crypto (I don’t actually have that domain, that’s just an example). No longer do you have to check every character of your ugly hexadecimal 0x43AB96D… ETH address to ensure you’re sending your ETH to the right person. We also have smart contract wallets like Argent wallet or the Gnosis safe. These allow for users to access their wallets and interact with DeFi self-custodially from an app on their phone without having to record a private key or recovery phrase. Instead, they offer social recovery and their UI is straight forward enough for anyone who uses a smart phone to understand. Finally, for the more experienced users, DApps like Uniswap have pretty, super easy to use graphical user interfaces and can be used by anyone who knows how to run and use a browser extension like Metamask.

The lack of an obvious #1 ETH killer

One of Ethereum’s biggest threats is for it to be overthrown by a so-called “Ethereum killer” blockchain which claims to do everything Ethereum can do and sometimes more. While there are competitors which are each formidable to a certain extent such as Polkadot, Cardano and EOS, each have their own weaknesses. For example, Polkadot and Cardano are not fully operational yet and EOS is much more centralised than Ethereum. As a result, none of these competitors have any significant network effects just yet relative to the behemoth which is Ethereum. This doesn’t mean that these projects aren’t a threat. In fact, I am sure that projects like Polkadot (which is more focused on complimenting Ethereum than killing it) will take a slice out of Ethereum’s pie. However, I am still very confident that Ethereum will remain on top due to the lack of a clear number 2 smart contract platform. Since none of these ETH killers stands out as the second place smart contract platform, it makes it much harder for one project to create a network effect which even begins to threaten Ethereum’s dominance. This leads me onto my next reason - network effects.

Network effects

This is another topic which I made a previous post on. The network effect is why Bitcoin is still the number one cryptocurrency and by such a long way. Bitcoin is not the most technologically advanced cryptocurrency. However, it has the most widespread name recognition and the most adoption in most metrics (ETH beats in in some metrics these days). The network effect is also why most people use Zoom and Facebook messengeWhatsApp despite the existence of free, private, end to end encrypted alternatives which have all the same features (https://meet.jit.si/ for zoom alternative and Signal for the private messenger app. I highly recommend both. Let’s get their network effects going!). It is the same for Bitcoin. People don’t want to have to learn about or set up a wallet for alternative options. People like what is familiar and what other people use. Nobody wants to be “that guy” who makes you download yet another app and account you have to remember the password/private key for. In the same way, Enterprises don’t want to have to create a bridge between their existing systems and a dozen different blockchains. Developers don’t want to have to create DeFi money legos from scratch on a new chain if they can just plug in to existing services like Uniswap. Likewise, users don’t want to have to download another browser extension to use DApps on another chain if they already use Ethereum. I know personally I have refrained from investing in altcoins because I would have to install another app on my hardware wallet or remember another recovery phrase.
Overthrowing Ethereum’s network effect is one hell of a big task these days. Time is running out for the ETH killers.

Ethereum is the most decentralised and provably neutral smart contract platform

Ethereum is also arguably the most decentralised and provably neutral smart contract platform (except for maybe Ethereum Classic on the neutrality part). Unlike some smart contract platforms, you can’t round up everyone at the Ethereum Foundation or any select group of people and expect to be able to stop the network. Not only this, but the Ethereum foundation doesn’t have the ability to print more ETH or push through changes as they wish like some people would lead you on to believe. The community would reject detrimental EIPs and hard fork. Ever since the DAO hack, the Ethereum community has made it clear that it will not accept EIPs which attempt to roll back the chain even to recover hacked funds (see EIP-999).
Even if governments around the world wanted to censor the Ethereum blockchain, under ETH 2.0’s proof of stake, it would be incredibly costly and would require a double digit percentage of the total ETH supply, much of which would be slashed (meaning they would lose it) as punishment for running dishonest validator nodes. This means that unlike with proof of work where a 51% attacker can keep attacking the network, under proof of stake, an attacker can only perform the attack a couple of times before they lose all of their ETH. This makes attacks much less financially viable than it is on proof of work chains. Network security is much more than what I laid out above and I am far from an expert but the improved resistance to 51% attacks which PoS provides is significant.
Finally, with the US dollar looking like it will lose its reserve currency status and the existing wire transfer system being outdated, superpowers like China won’t want to use US systems and the US won’t want to use a Chinese system. Enter Ethereum, the provably neutral settlement layer where the USA and China don’t have to trust each other or each other’s banks because they can trust Ethereum. While it may sound like a long shot, it does make sense if Ethereum hits a multi-trillion dollar market cap that it is the most secure and neutral way to transfer value between these adversaries. Not to mention if much of the world’s commerce were to be settled in the same place - on Ethereum - then it would make sense for governments to settle on the same platform.

ETH distribution is decentralised

Thanks to over 5 years of proof of work - a system where miners have to sell newly minted ETH to pay for electricity costs - newly mined ETH has found its way into the hands of everyday people who buy ETH off miners selling on exchnages. As pointed out by u/AdamSC1 in his analysis of the top 10K ETH addresses (I highly recommend reading this if you haven’t already), the distribution of ETH is actually slightly more decentralised than Bitcoin with the top 10,000 ETH wallets holding 56.70% of ETH supply compared to the top 10,000 Bitcoin wallets which hold 57.44% of the Bitcoin supply. This decentralised distribution means that the introduction of staking won’t centralise ETH in the hands of a few wallets who could then control the network. This is an advantage for ETH which many proof of stake ETH killers will never have as they never used PoW to distribute funds widely throughout the community and these ETH killers often did funding rounds giving large numbers of tokens to VC investors.

The community

Finally, while I may be biased, I think that Ethereum has the friendliest community. Anecdotally, I find that the Ethereum developer community is full of forward thinking people who want to make the world a better place and build a better future, many of whom are altruistic and don’t always act in their best interests. Compare this to the much more conservative, “at least we’re safe while the world burns” attitude which many Bitcoiners have. I don’t want to generalise too much here as the Bitcoin community is great too and there are some wonderful people there. But the difference is clear if you compare the daily discussion of Bitcoin to the incredibly helpful and welcoming daily discussion of EthFinance who will happily answer your noob questions without calling you an idiot and telling you to do you own research (there are plenty more examples in any of the daily threads). Or the very helpful folks over at EthStaker who will go out of their way to help you set up an ETH 2.0 staking node on the testnets (Shoutout to u/superphiz who does a lot of work over in that sub!). Don’t believe me? Head over to those subs and see for yourself.
Please don’t hate on me if you disagree about which project has the best community, it is just my very biased personal opinion and I respect your opinion if you disagree! :)

TL;DR:

submitted by Tricky_Troll to ethtrader [link] [comments]

A detailed summary of every reason why I am bullish on ETH.

The following will be a list of the many reasons why I hold and am extremely bullish on ETH.

This is an extremely long post. If you just want the hopium without the detail, read the TL;DR at the bottom.

ETH 2.0

As we all know, ETH 2.0 phase 0 is right around the corner. This will lock up ETH and stakers will earn interest on their ETH in return for securing the network. Next comes phase 1 where the ETH 2 shards are introduced, shards are essentially parallel blockchains which are each responsible for a different part of Ethereum’s workload, think of it like a multi-core processor vs a single core processor. During phase 1, these shards will only act as data availability layers and won’t actually process transactions yet. However, their data can be utilised by the L2 scaling solution, rollups, increasing Ethereum’s throughput in transactions per second up to 100,000 TPS.
After phase 1 comes phase 1.5 which will move the ETH 1.0 chain into an ETH 2 shard and Ethereum will be fully secured by proof of stake. This means that ETH issuance will drop from around 5% per year to less than 1% and with EIP-1559, ETH might become a deflationary asset, but more on that later.
Finally, with ETH 2.0 phase two, each shard will be fully functional chains. With 64 of them, we can expect the base layer of Ethereum to scale around 64x, not including the massive scaling which comes from layer 2 scaling solutions like rollups as previously mentioned.
While the scaling benefits and ETH issuance reduction which comes with ETH 2.0 will be massive, they aren’t the only benefits. We also get benefits such as increased security from PoS compared to PoW, a huge energy efficiency improvement due to the removal of PoW and also the addition of eWASM which will allow contracts to be programmed in a wide range of programming languages, opening the floodgates for millions of web devs who want to be involved in Ethereum but don’t know Ethereum’s programming language, Solidity.

EIP-1559 and ETH scarcity

As I covered in a previous post of mine, ETH doesn’t have a supply cap like Bitcoin. Instead, it has a monetary policy of “minimum viable issuance”, not only is this is a good thing for network security, but with the addition of EIP-1559, it leaves the door open to the possibility of ETH issuance going negative. In short, EIP-1559 changes the fee market to make transaction prices more efficient (helping to alleviate high gas fees!) by burning a variable base fee which changes based on network usage demand rather than using a highest bidder market where miners simply include who pays them the most. This will result in most of the ETH being paid in transaction fees being burned. As of late, the amount which would be burned if EIP-1559 was in Ethereum right now would make ETH a deflationary asset!

Layer 2 Scaling

In the mean time while we are waiting for ETH 2.0, layer 2 scaling is here. Right now, projects such as Deversifi or Loopring utilise rollups to scale to thousands of tx/s on their decentralised exchange platforms or HoneySwap which uses xDai to offer a more scalable alternative to UniSwap. Speaking of which, big DeFi players like UniSwap and Synthetix are actively looking into using optimistic rollups to scale while maintaining composability between DeFi platforms. The most bullish thing about L2 scaling is all of the variety of options. Here’s a non exhaustive list of Ethereum L2 scaling solutions: - Aztec protocol (L2 scaling + privacy!) - ZKSync - Loopring - Raiden - Arbitrum Rollups - xDai - OMGNetwork - Matic - FuelLabs - Starkware - Optimism - Celer Network - + Many more

DeFi and Composability

If you’re reading this, I am sure you are aware of the phenomena which is Decentralised Finance (DeFi or more accurately, open finance). Ethereum is the first platform to offer permissionless and immutable financial services which when interacting with each other, lead to unprecedented composability and innovation in financial applications. A whole new world of possibilities are opening up thanks to this composability as it allows anyone to take existing pieces of open source code from other DeFi projects, put them together like lego pieces (hence the term money legos) and create something the world has never seen before. None of this was possible before Ethereum because typically financial services are heavily regulated and FinTech is usually proprietary software, so you don’t have any open source lego bricks to build off and you have to build everything you need from scratch. That is if what you want to do is even legal for a centralised institution!
Oh, and if you think that DeFi was just a fad and the bubble has popped, guess again! Total value locked in DeFi is currently at an all time high. Don’t believe me? Find out for yourself at: https://defipulse.com

NFTs and tokeniation

NFTs or “Non-Fungible Tokens” - despite the name which may confuse a layman - are a basic concept. They are unique tokens with their own unique attributes. This allows you to create digital art, human readable names for your ETH address (see ENS names and unstoppable domains), breedable virtual collectible creatures like crypto kitties, ownable in game assets like Gods Unchained cards or best of all in my opinion, tokenised ownership of real world assets which can even be split into pieces (this doesn’t necessarily require an NFT. Fungible tokens can be/are used for some of the following use cases). This could be tokenised ownership of real estate (see RealT), tokenised ownership of stocks, bonds and other financial assets (which by the way makes them tradable 24/7 and divisible unlike through the traditional system) or even tokenised ownership of the future income of a celebrity or athlete (see when NBA Star Spencer Dinwiddie Tokenized His Own NBA Contract.

Institutional Adoption

Ethereum is by far the most widely adopted blockchain by enterprises. Ethereum’s Enterprise Ethereum Alliance (EEA) is the largest blockchain-enterprise partnership program and Ethereum is by far the most frequently leveraged blockchain for proof of concepts and innovation in the blockchain space by enterprises. Meanwhile, there are protocols like the Baseline protocol which is a shared framework which allows enterprises to use Ethereum as a common frame of reference and a base settlement layer without having to give up privacy when settling on the public Ethereum mainnet. This framework makes adopting Ethereum much easier for other enterprises.

Institutional Investment

One of Bitcoin’s biggest things it has going for it right now is the growing institutional investment. In case you were wondering, Ethereum has this too! Grayscale offers investment in the cryptocurrency space for financial institutions and their Ethereum fund has already locked up more than 2% of the total supply of ETH. Not only this, but as businesses transact on Ethereum and better understand it, not only will they buy up ETH to pay for their transactions, but they will also realise that much like Bitcoin, Ethereum is a scarce asset. Better yet, a scarce asset which offers yield. As a result, I expect to see companies having ETH holdings become the norm just like how Bitcoin is becoming more widespread on companies’ balance sheets.

The state of global markets

With asset prices in almost every asset class at or near all-time highs and interest rates lower than ever and even negative in some cases, there really aren’t many good opportunities in the traditional financial system right now. Enter crypto - clearly the next evolution of financial services (as I explained in the section on DeFi earlier in this post), with scarce assets built in at the protocol layer, buying BTC or ETH is a lot like buying shares in TCP/IP in 1990 (that is if the underlying protocols of the internet could be invested in which they couldn’t). Best of all, major cryptos are down from their all-time highs anywhere between 35% for BTC or 70% for ETH and much more for many altcoins. This means that they can significantly appreciate in value before entering uncharted, speculative bubble territory.
While of course we could fall dramatically at any moment in the current macro financial conditions, as a longer term play, crypto is very alluring. The existing financial system has shown that it is in dire need of replacing and the potential replacement has started rearing its head in the form of crypto and DeFi.

Improvements in user onboarding and abstracting away complexity

Ethereum has started making huge leaps forward in terms of usability for the end user. We now have ENS names and unstoppable domains which allow you to send ETH to yournamehere.ETH or TrickyTroll.crypto (I don’t actually have that domain, that’s just an example). No longer do you have to check every character of your ugly hexadecimal 0x43AB96D… ETH address to ensure you’re sending your ETH to the right person. We also have smart contract wallets like Argent wallet or the Gnosis safe. These allow for users to access their wallets and interact with DeFi self-custodially from an app on their phone without having to record a private key or recovery phrase. Instead, they offer social recovery and their UI is straight forward enough for anyone who uses a smart phone to understand. Finally, for the more experienced users, DApps like Uniswap have pretty, super easy to use graphical user interfaces and can be used by anyone who knows how to run and use a browser extension like Metamask.

The lack of an obvious #1 ETH killer

One of Ethereum’s biggest threats is for it to be overthrown by a so-called “Ethereum killer” blockchain which claims to do everything Ethereum can do and sometimes more. While there are competitors which are each formidable to a certain extent such as Polkadot, Cardano and EOS, each have their own weaknesses. For example, Polkadot and Cardano are not fully operational yet and EOS is much more centralised than Ethereum. As a result, none of these competitors have any significant network effects just yet relative to the behemoth which is Ethereum. This doesn’t mean that these projects aren’t a threat. In fact, I am sure that projects like Polkadot (which is more focused on complimenting Ethereum than killing it) will take a slice out of Ethereum’s pie. However, I am still very confident that Ethereum will remain on top due to the lack of a clear number 2 smart contract platform. Since none of these ETH killers stands out as the second place smart contract platform, it makes it much harder for one project to create a network effect which even begins to threaten Ethereum’s dominance. This leads me onto my next reason - network effects.

Network effects

This is another topic which I made a previous post on. The network effect is why Bitcoin is still the number one cryptocurrency and by such a long way. Bitcoin is not the most technologically advanced cryptocurrency. However, it has the most widespread name recognition and the most adoption in most metrics (ETH beats in in some metrics these days). The network effect is also why most people use Zoom and Facebook messengeWhatsApp despite the existence of free, private, end to end encrypted alternatives which have all the same features (https://meet.jit.si/ for zoom alternative and Signal for the private messenger app. I highly recommend both. Let’s get their network effects going!). It is the same for Bitcoin. People don’t want to have to learn about or set up a wallet for alternative options. People like what is familiar and what other people use. Nobody wants to be “that guy” who makes you download yet another app and account you have to remember the password/private key for. In the same way, Enterprises don’t want to have to create a bridge between their existing systems and a dozen different blockchains. Developers don’t want to have to create DeFi money legos from scratch on a new chain if they can just plug in to existing services like Uniswap. Likewise, users don’t want to have to download another browser extension to use DApps on another chain if they already use Ethereum. I know personally I have refrained from investing in altcoins because I would have to install another app on my hardware wallet or remember another recovery phrase.
Overthrowing Ethereum’s network effect is one hell of a big task these days. Time is running out for the ETH killers.

Ethereum is the most decentralised and provably neutral smart contract platform

Ethereum is also arguably the most decentralised and provably neutral smart contract platform (except for maybe Ethereum Classic on the neutrality part). Unlike some smart contract platforms, you can’t round up everyone at the Ethereum Foundation or any select group of people and expect to be able to stop the network. Not only this, but the Ethereum foundation doesn’t have the ability to print more ETH or push through changes as they wish like some people would lead you on to believe. The community would reject detrimental EIPs and hard fork. Ever since the DAO hack, the Ethereum community has made it clear that it will not accept EIPs which attempt to roll back the chain even to recover hacked funds (see EIP-999).
Even if governments around the world wanted to censor the Ethereum blockchain, under ETH 2.0’s proof of stake, it would be incredibly costly and would require a double digit percentage of the total ETH supply, much of which would be slashed (meaning they would lose it) as punishment for running dishonest validator nodes. This means that unlike with proof of work where a 51% attacker can keep attacking the network, under proof of stake, an attacker can only perform the attack a couple of times before they lose all of their ETH. This makes attacks much less financially viable than it is on proof of work chains. Network security is much more than what I laid out above and I am far from an expert but the improved resistance to 51% attacks which PoS provides is significant.
Finally, with the US dollar looking like it will lose its reserve currency status and the existing wire transfer system being outdated, superpowers like China won’t want to use US systems and the US won’t want to use a Chinese system. Enter Ethereum, the provably neutral settlement layer where the USA and China don’t have to trust each other or each other’s banks because they can trust Ethereum. While it may sound like a long shot, it does make sense if Ethereum hits a multi-trillion dollar market cap that it is the most secure and neutral way to transfer value between these adversaries. Not to mention if much of the world’s commerce were to be settled in the same place - on Ethereum - then it would make sense for governments to settle on the same platform.

ETH distribution is decentralised

Thanks to over 5 years of proof of work - a system where miners have to sell newly minted ETH to pay for electricity costs - newly mined ETH has found its way into the hands of everyday people who buy ETH off miners selling on exchnages. As pointed out by u/AdamSC1 in his analysis of the top 10K ETH addresses (I highly recommend reading this if you haven’t already), the distribution of ETH is actually slightly more decentralised than Bitcoin with the top 10,000 ETH wallets holding 56.70% of ETH supply compared to the top 10,000 Bitcoin wallets which hold 57.44% of the Bitcoin supply. This decentralised distribution means that the introduction of staking won’t centralise ETH in the hands of a few wallets who could then control the network. This is an advantage for ETH which many proof of stake ETH killers will never have as they never used PoW to distribute funds widely throughout the community and these ETH killers often did funding rounds giving large numbers of tokens to VC investors.

The community

Finally, while I may be biased, I think that Ethereum has the friendliest community. Anecdotally, I find that the Ethereum developer community is full of forward thinking people who want to make the world a better place and build a better future, many of whom are altruistic and don’t always act in their best interests. Compare this to the much more conservative, “at least we’re safe while the world burns” attitude which many Bitcoiners have. I don’t want to generalise too much here as the Bitcoin community is great too and there are some wonderful people there. But the difference is clear if you compare the daily discussion of Bitcoin to the incredibly helpful and welcoming daily discussion of EthFinance who will happily answer your noob questions without calling you an idiot and telling you to do you own research (there are plenty more examples in any of the daily threads). Or the very helpful folks over at EthStaker who will go out of their way to help you set up an ETH 2.0 staking node on the testnets (Shoutout to u/superphiz who does a lot of work over in that sub!). Don’t believe me? Head over to those subs and see for yourself.
Please don’t hate on me if you disagree about which project has the best community, it is just my very biased personal opinion and I respect your opinion if you disagree! :)

TL;DR:

submitted by Tricky_Troll to ethfinance [link] [comments]

More fun with OP_HODL (CheckLockTimeVerify)

Last week I wrote a post with a script to create a HODL address. A HODL address is a UTXO that cannot be spent until a certain epoch time or blocktime. It can be used to secure funds in a will or trust that has a designated maturity date. Or you may have some other reason to lock the funds, the point is that the UTXO can be physically verified to be funded, and under an unbreakable timelock.
I've liked the feature but have been frustrated that there is limited HW and SW wallet support for it presently. My previous post walked through how to make a segwit HODL UTXO, this post will detail how to make a BIP16 legacy P2SH HODL UTXO.
Similar to last week, I wrote a bitcoinlib script to do it, but this week I also went through the steps to do it on the CoinBin wallet. CoinBin is a JavaScript wallet that can (and should) be run locally. CoinBin, or raw python (bitcoinlib) are the only ways I currently know of to spend a HODL address.
Here's the basic rundown to create and fund your UTXO with CoinBin
  1. Use either Electrum or Bitcoin Core to collect a Bitcoin public and private key.
  2. Run the CoinBin app either locally (best option) or through the live site
  3. Choose New -> Time Locked Address
  4. Enter the public key (from #1) and either a block height or timestamp for your lock
  5. Hit Submit and record the address and redeem script
  6. Ensure you have accurately recorded everything in step #1 and step #5
  7. Send funds to the address recorded in step 5 as you normally would.
Here's the basic rundown on how to spend your UTXO with CoinBin
  1. Use either Electrum or Bitcoin Core to collect an address to spend your UTXO to
  2. Run the CoinBin app either locally (best option) or through the live site
  3. Choose New -> Transaction
  4. Enter the Redeem Script you copied in the creation process (step #5), then Load
  5. After a few minutes it should automatically load your UTXO into the form
  6. Enter the address you want to spend your UTXO to and adjust the output amount for fees
  7. Hit the question mark next to Transaction Fee for the calculator
  8. Hit Submit when satisfied and record the unsigned transaction data
  9. Select Sign on the top nav bar to begin the signing operation
  10. Enter your private key from the creation process (step #1) and the unsigned TXN
  11. Select Submit to produce the signed TXN
  12. Broadcast the signed TXN with either Electrum or Bitcoin Core
Note, if you try to broadcast before the UTXO's timelock expires, you will get a terse not final error in either Electrum or Core.
For Extra Credit, CoinBin can also be run against Testnet, but to do so you have to unhide the settings element, manually code the TXN input script and manually code the TXN nLockTime to sync with your HODL address.
Here are a Testnet and Mainnet HODL spend TXN I created in CoinBin * Mainnet: txid ea6a1...79d53 * Testnet: txid a8110...adc93
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Spending an OP_HODL (CheckLockTimeVerify) address with Electrum.

I've been playing around with OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY (op_hodl) for the last few weeks since I haven't found it easy to do in many wallets. Eariler I posted on using the CoinBin wallet interface (locally) to do it, and before that I posted a P2WSH bitcoinlib script to do it.
Today I finally sat down and wrote a script using only Electrum's API. You can run it as any Python script by having Electrum installed from source. Or if you're cavalier (and crazy) you can run it directly from the electrum console with the following command, assuming you put the script in C:\temp.
with open(r"C:\temp\elec-p2sh-hodl.py", 'r') as s: exec(s.read())
It should be noted, that one should NEVER do this, since it is effectively giving me control of your Electrum wallet (bad). It is coded to testnet if that is any consolation.
The script is designed to recreate TXN a8110...adc93, but with Electrum 4.0.4, the R-value grinding causes the signature size to differ, causing signature malleability. Apparently CoinBin and bitcoinlib haven't followed Core when they made this change in 0.17.0. The TXN is still valid, just with a different hash.
If you want to spend a different OP_HODL address, you can hopefully see the simple fields required to change.
References: * The new Electrum OP_HODL spend P2SH script * The bitcoinlib OP_HODL spend P2SH script * The bitcoinlib OP_HODL spend P2WSH script * Thread detailing how to spend a P2SH OP_HODL address in CoinBin * Thread initially discussing OP_HODL in general * The original PR to standardize R-value grinding in Bitcoin Core * Thread discussing my surprise at signature malleability * Request to implement R-value grinding in bitcoinlib
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Gridcoin 5.0.0.0-Mandatory "Fern" Release

https://github.com/gridcoin-community/Gridcoin-Research/releases/tag/5.0.0.0
Finally! After over ten months of development and testing, "Fern" has arrived! This is a whopper. 240 pull requests merged. Essentially a complete rewrite that was started with the scraper (the "neural net" rewrite) in "Denise" has now been completed. Practically the ENTIRE Gridcoin specific codebase resting on top of the vanilla Bitcoin/Peercoin/Blackcoin vanilla PoS code has been rewritten. This removes the team requirement at last (see below), although there are many other important improvements besides that.
Fern was a monumental undertaking. We had to encode all of the old rules active for the v10 block protocol in new code and ensure that the new code was 100% compatible. This had to be done in such a way as to clear out all of the old spaghetti and ring-fence it with tightly controlled class implementations. We then wrote an entirely new, simplified ruleset for research rewards and reengineered contracts (which includes beacon management, polls, and voting) using properly classed code. The fundamentals of Gridcoin with this release are now on a very sound and maintainable footing, and the developers believe the codebase as updated here will serve as the fundamental basis for Gridcoin's future roadmap.
We have been testing this for MONTHS on testnet in various stages. The v10 (legacy) compatibility code has been running on testnet continuously as it was developed to ensure compatibility with existing nodes. During the last few months, we have done two private testnet forks and then the full public testnet testing for v11 code (the new protocol which is what Fern implements). The developers have also been running non-staking "sentinel" nodes on mainnet with this code to verify that the consensus rules are problem-free for the legacy compatibility code on the broader mainnet. We believe this amount of testing is going to result in a smooth rollout.
Given the amount of changes in Fern, I am presenting TWO changelogs below. One is high level, which summarizes the most significant changes in the protocol. The second changelog is the detailed one in the usual format, and gives you an inkling of the size of this release.

Highlights

Protocol

Note that the protocol changes will not become active until we cross the hard-fork transition height to v11, which has been set at 2053000. Given current average block spacing, this should happen around October 4, about one month from now.
Note that to get all of the beacons in the network on the new protocol, we are requiring ALL beacons to be validated. A two week (14 day) grace period is provided by the code, starting at the time of the transition height, for people currently holding a beacon to validate the beacon and prevent it from expiring. That means that EVERY CRUNCHER must advertise and validate their beacon AFTER the v11 transition (around Oct 4th) and BEFORE October 18th (or more precisely, 14 days from the actual date of the v11 transition). If you do not advertise and validate your beacon by this time, your beacon will expire and you will stop earning research rewards until you advertise and validate a new beacon. This process has been made much easier by a brand new beacon "wizard" that helps manage beacon advertisements and renewals. Once a beacon has been validated and is a v11 protocol beacon, the normal 180 day expiration rules apply. Note, however, that the 180 day expiration on research rewards has been removed with the Fern update. This means that while your beacon might expire after 180 days, your earned research rewards will be retained and can be claimed by advertising a beacon with the same CPID and going through the validation process again. In other words, you do not lose any earned research rewards if you do not stake a block within 180 days and keep your beacon up-to-date.
The transition height is also when the team requirement will be relaxed for the network.

GUI

Besides the beacon wizard, there are a number of improvements to the GUI, including new UI transaction types (and icons) for staking the superblock, sidestake sends, beacon advertisement, voting, poll creation, and transactions with a message. The main screen has been revamped with a better summary section, and better status icons. Several changes under the hood have improved GUI performance. And finally, the diagnostics have been revamped.

Blockchain

The wallet sync speed has been DRASTICALLY improved. A decent machine with a good network connection should be able to sync the entire mainnet blockchain in less than 4 hours. A fast machine with a really fast network connection and a good SSD can do it in about 2.5 hours. One of our goals was to reduce or eliminate the reliance on snapshots for mainnet, and I think we have accomplished that goal with the new sync speed. We have also streamlined the in-memory structures for the blockchain which shaves some memory use.
There are so many goodies here it is hard to summarize them all.
I would like to thank all of the contributors to this release, but especially thank @cyrossignol, whose incredible contributions formed the backbone of this release. I would also like to pay special thanks to @barton2526, @caraka, and @Quezacoatl1, who tirelessly helped during the testing and polishing phase on testnet with testing and repeated builds for all architectures.
The developers are proud to present this release to the community and we believe this represents the starting point for a true renaissance for Gridcoin!

Summary Changelog

Accrual

Changed

Most significantly, nodes calculate research rewards directly from the magnitudes in EACH superblock between stakes instead of using a two- or three- point average based on a CPID's current magnitude and the magnitude for the CPID when it last staked. For those long-timers in the community, this has been referred to as "Superblock Windows," and was first done in proof-of-concept form by @denravonska.

Removed

Beacons

Added

Changed

Removed

Unaltered

As a reminder:

Superblocks

Added

Changed

Removed

Voting

Added

Changed

Removed

Detailed Changelog

[5.0.0.0] 2020-09-03, mandatory, "Fern"

Added

Changed

Removed

Fixed

submitted by jamescowens to gridcoin [link] [comments]

Power of the Command Line (bitcoin-cli, hwi, electrum, trezorctl)

I think some of the console tools available with HW wallets today are greatly under utilized. Here's a quick write-up on how to create and sign a TXN very similar to 43d27...1fc06 found on the SLIP-14 wallet. I'll be using TrezorCTL, Electrum, and HWI for the signing. I won't go much into the setup or install, but feel free to ask if you have questions about it. Note, you don't have to use all three of these. Any one will produce a valid signed TXN for broadcast. I just showed how to do it three ways. Whats more some of the Electrum and HWI steps are interchangeable.
ColdCard also has a utility called ckcc that will do the sign operation instead of HWI, but in many ways they are interchangeable. KeepKey and Ledger both have libraries for scripted signing but no one-shot, one-line console apps that I know of. But HWI and Electrum of course work on all four.

TrezorCTL

This is the what most would think of to use to craft and sign TXNs, and is definitely very simple. The signing uses a script called build_tx.py to create a JSON file that is then used by the btc sign-tx command. The whole process is basically:
  1. tools/build_tx.py | trezorctl btc sign-tx -
This just means, take the output of build_tx and sign it. To copy 43d27...1fc06, I wrote a small script to feed build_tx, so my process looks like:
  1. ~/input.sh | tools/build_tx.py | trezorctl btc sign-tx -
But it's all very simple. Note... I used TrezorCTL v0.12.2 but build_tx.py version 0.13.0 1.

input.sh

```

!/bin/bash

secho() { sleep 1; echo $*}
secho "Testnet" # coin name secho "tbtc1.trezor.io" # blockbook server and outpoint (below) secho "e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00:0" secho "m/84'/1'/0'/0/0" # prev_out derivation to signing key secho "4294967293" # Sequence for RBF; hex(-3) secho "segwit" # Signature type on prev_out to use secho "" # NACK to progress to outs secho "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3" # out[0].addr secho "10000000" # out[1].amt secho "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu" # out[1].addr secho "20000000" # out[1].amt secho "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x" # out[2].addr secho "99999694" # out[2].amt secho "" # NACK to progress to change secho "" # NACK to skip change secho "2" # txn.version secho "0" # txn.locktime ```

Electrum

Electrum is one of the better GUI wallets available, but it also has a pretty good console interface. Like before you need your Trezor with the SLIP-14 wallet loaded and paired to Electrum. I'll assume Electrum is up and running with the Trezor wallet loaded to make things simple.
Like with TrezorCTL, Electrum feeds on a JSON file, but unlike TrezorCTL it needs that JSON squished into the command line. This is a simple sed command, but I won't bore you with the details, but just assume that's done. So the process in Electrum (v4.0.3) looks like:
  1. electrum serialize (create psbt to sign)
  2. electrum --wallet signtransaction (sign said psbt)
Still pretty simple right! Below is the JSON I smushed for #1

txn.json

{ "inputs": [{ "prevout_hash":"e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00", "prevout_n": 0, "value_sats": 129999867 }], "outputs": [{ "address": "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3", "value_sats": 10000000 },{ "address": "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu", "value_sats": 20000000 },{ "address": "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x", "value_sats": 99999694 }]}

HWI

HWI is an unsung hero in my book. It's a very small clean and simple interface between HW wallets and Bitcoin Core. It currently supports a good range of HW wallets. It keeps itself narrowly focused on TXN signing and offloads most everything else to Bitcoin Core. Again, I'll assume you've imported your Trezor keypool into Core and done the requisite IBD and rescan. And if you don't have the RPC enabled, you can always clone these commands into the QT-console.
To sign our TXN in HWI (v1.1.2), we will first need to craft (and finalize) it in Bitcoin Core (0.21.1). Like in Electrum, we will have to use simple sed to smush some JSON into command arguments, but I'll assume you have that covered. It will take an inputs.json and an outputs.json named separately.
  1. bitcoin-cli createpsbt (create psbt)
  2. bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet= walletprocesspsbt (process psbt)
  3. hwi -f signtx (sign psbt)
  4. bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet= finalizepsbt (get a signed TXN from psbt)
A little more involved, but still nothing too bad. Plus this gives you the full power of Bitcoin Core including integrations with LND (lightning).

inputs.json

[{ "txid": "e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00", "vout": 0 }]

outputs.json

[{ "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3": 0.10000000 },{ "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu": 0.20000000 },{ "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x": 0.99999694 }]

Conclusion

This may all seem like very low level coding, but is surprisingly simple once you get a knack for it. Whats more, all these platforms support testnet which allows you to practice with valueless coins until you get the hang of it. And, like many things in bitcoin, this is all (mostly) python, which is one of the easier languages to learn.
Enjoy
Footnotes
1 - https://github.com/trezotrezor-firmware/issues/1296
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to sell xBricks for money (self post for mod approval)

Preface
I've written this guide with those that are unfamiliar with crypto in mind, however it's still a lengthy process. I'm going to try to present this in a way where you don't have to learn how the underlying crypto technology works, but I will add in links to relevant concepts in case you're curious. This process was a lot more complicated before but I made a web interface to simplify it.
At the time of writing this, FortniteBR BRICKs are worth 10 cents a piece. That makes 1000 bricks worth 100 bucks. The liquidity pool is about $14,000 at the time of writing, meaning that there's room in the market for you to hypothetically get $7,000 if you had a lot of BRICKs.
If at any point throughout this process you need help, DM me!
Misc. Resources That Might Be Helpful
What you need
You will need:
Step 1: Setup
On your desktop computer, install MetaMask. This is an Ethereum Wallet which will allow you to interact with the Ethereum Network and its many sidechains. More on this later.
Follow the setup instructions in MetaMask. If you've never done this before, you'll need to create a new seed phrase. Video tutorial if you get stuck.
YOUR SEED PHRASE IS THE KEY TO YOUR WALLET. ANYONE WHO HAS ACCESS TO YOUR SEED PHRASE CAN TAKE YOUR FUNDS. IF YOU LOSE YOUR SEED PHRASE YOU HAVE NO WAY TO RECOVER YOUR FUNDS. WRITE IT DOWN AND STORE IT IN A SAFE PLACE!!! NEVER GIVE IT OUT TO ANYONE - ANYONE THAT ASKS FOR YOUR SEED PHRASE IS TRYING TO SCAM YOU! DON'T FALL FOR IT!
In the MetaMask interface, you'll see "Main Ethereum Network". This process uses two networks. One of them is the Rinkeby Testnet (where the BRICK tokens are natively) and one of them is the xDAI network which is where we will bridge the tokens to in order to exchange them for Dai, a token which is pegged to the price of the dollar.
From the dropdown, select Rinkeby Testnet. If you're in the assets tab, you should see a thing that shows your ETH balance. Below this, you should see an "add token" button. Click it. Go to "Custom Token" at the top. In "token contract address," paste in the following:
0xe0d8d7b8273de14e628d2f2a4a10f719f898450a
The other fields will autofill. Hit next. You'll now see your BRICK balance (which will be 0, you haven't transferred your bricks yet) in MetaMask if you've done everything right.
You'll need Rinkeby Ether to cover transaction fees. Since we're on a testnet, the Ether is worthless which means people hand it out for free. You can get this Ether from a variety of places:
Now it's time to get your BRICKs from your Reddit vault into your MetaMask wallet.
WARNING: ALL CRYPTO TRANSACTIONS ARE IRREVERSIBLE.
Your Ethereum address shows up under Rinkeby. It should be "0x" followed by a bunch of hex characters. Click on it to copy it to your clipboard. You now need to somehow get this to your mobile device. Email it to yourself, text it to yourself, whatever.
On your Reddit mobile app home screen, click on your profile icon and then go to vault. You'll need to set this up and claim your tokens if you haven't already. Be aware that this is also technically an Ethereum wallet. Keep your seed phrase safe.
Send however many BRICKs you want to sell to your MetaMask wallet. Check to make sure the addresses are the same, but don't worry too much about making a typo or whatever. The chances that you'd make a typo that would result in a valid Ethereum address are slim, if you get a character wrong it'll just tell you it's not a real Ethereum address and prevent you from sending.
It may show an error when you try to send. This is somewhat rare but pretty normal. They often run out of testnet Ether. Come back later and try again.
If it works properly, it'll take about a minute to go through. It may take longer than that.
Once the transaction goes through, you'll see that you have an absurd amount of BRICKs in MetaMask. No, there wasn't a glitch. The people who wrote the code for BRICKs made the decimals of precision weird for some reason. It's off by a factor of 1018. This isn't a big deal.
If you see Bricks and Ether (ETH) in your MetaMask wallet, proceed to the next step. If you're having issues, feel free to DM me.
Step 2: Getting Your BRICKs from Rinkeby to xDai
There's a LOT going on under the hood for this part (deets for those interested). Previously this required manually generating contract interactions, which is kind of a pain if you're new to Ethereum. I made a UI to make this easier (it generates the transactions for you, all you have to do is sign them with your wallet). This took way longer to do than you might guess, so feel free to help a homie out at:
0x4BCcC2569DD93C7dF43431A7b70db569dedB6187
Go to my tool. Hit connect. If you're on the Rinkeby network, it should show your balance in BRICKs. Enter the amount you want to bridge (probably all of them). If neither of us have made any mistakes, it should pop up with a request to spend your BRICKs. If there's any issue with this tool, DM me. This allows the TokenBridge contract to take your BRICKs and put them on the xDai network where you can sell them. This is the part where you'll get an error if you don't have any testnet ETH. Set the gas price to 1 (the suggested price is based on the Main Ethereum Network - it's way too high). After you approve that, it'll give you another thing to accept. This is the actual transaction where it'll bridge to xDai. Again, make sure the gas price is set to 1 and confirm the transaction.
Add xDai to MetaMask
Switch to the xDai network. We're going to add another token. Again, go to "add token" > "custom token" > "token contract address". Paste in:
0x2f9ceBf5De3bc25E0643D0E66134E5bf5c48e191
If the transactions have gone through, you should see your xBricks (the name for BRICKs that have been bridged to xDai) in MetaMask. If not, wait a bit for the transactions to go through. Sometimes there are slowdowns that cause bridging to take a while. Shouldn't take too long, though. Once that's done, you're ready for the next step.
Step 3: Trading Your xBricks for xDai
Go to Honeyswap. Hit "select a token." You'll need to paste in the xBrick address again. Here it is:
0x2f9ceBf5De3bc25E0643D0E66134E5bf5c48e191
Click xBrick.
You'll need to flipflop the trade around by hitting the arrow button. xBrick should be on top. Type in the amount of xBricks you want to sell, or hit max to sell all of them. 1 xDai = $1. You'll need to hit approve first. Set gas price to 1 again. Then you can complete the trade by hitting swap. After a bit, the xDai should show up in your wallet.
Step 4: Mainnet
Everything on Mainnet costs actual money to do. It costs about 50 cents to make a transaction and it costs about 3 bucks to use an exchange like the one we just used. If you don't have mainnet Ether, you won't be able to do anything with your mainnet Dai (what xDai is called when it's bridged back to the main Ethereum network). You may be able to find someone to lend you some ETH to make these transactions with. Whatever you do, just be aware.
If you still want to bridge your xDai into Dai, go here and make sure xDai is on the left. If it's not, go in the top right and select xDai chain. Enter the amount of xDai you want to bridge to mainnet and then hit transfer. Follow the prompts. This part may take up to an hour due to recent network congestion. After it's done, if you go back to Main Ethereum Network in MetaMask you should see your Dai.
If you have a few bucks of ETH, you can use UniSwap to convert your Dai to even more ETH. Uniswap tutorial
Things you can do with ETH
submitted by Oninteressant123 to u/Oninteressant123 [link] [comments]

The power of "import electrum" as a python bitcoin scripting engine

I've been a big fan of Electrum as a wallet for a while now. Traditionally, when I wanted to do bitcoin scripting I would use either trezorlib, pycoin, or bitcoinlib. But recently I was digging a bit deeper into the Electrum source and found it to be one of the simpler python libraries to use to craft bitcoin transactions.
One of the nicer things about Electrum as a scripting engine is that you can drop the standalone app or AppImage on a system and run your scripts directly through the console. This makes doing things on Tails or other locked down systems much easier. To run one one of your scripts (without the event loop) simply type (assuming you correct the file path):
with open(r"myscript.py", 'r') as s: exec(s.read())
Obviously only do this with scripts you've personally authored. Never run random code on your machine especially when wallet private keys are in play.
There are already some great scripting examples in the electrum\scripts folder, but most of these use the event loop which brings in a lot of overhead. I found simple TXN processing can easily be done without spawning an full electrum thread. I'd be happy to PR the samples if there is any interest in this style from the maintainers.
Here's two examples I put together that craft a BIP65 spending transaction. It turned out to be much simpler than I imagined. I did it both in bitcoinlib and electrum. The structure is very similar and should hopefully be easier to follow. Feel free to start a PythonRoastMe on it.
Two things of note. I had to disable R-value grinding (nuked while loop) so that I had parity with bitcoinlib, which hasn't rolled it out yet. This is why the TXIDs differ. I also had to override the the PartialTransaction.get_preimage_script method since it makes certain multisig assumptions that don't apply to generic scripting.
Reference: * Electrum script to spend an OP_HODL P2WSH address (txid 3a461e6...78de2b6) * Electrum script to spend an OP_HODL P2SH address (txid a8110bb...3dadc93) * BitcoinLib script to spend an OP_HODL P2WSH address (txid 3a461e6...78de2b6) * BitcoinLib script to spend an OP_HODL P2SH address (txid a8110bb...3dadc93) * TXID 3a461e6...78de2b6 (P2WSH) on the blockchain * TXID a8110bb...3dadc93 (P2SH) on the blockchain * BIP-0065: OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY (aka OP_HODL) * BIP-0141: P2WSH symantics * BIP-0016: P2SH symantics
submitted by brianddk to Electrum [link] [comments]

Windows / Linux Guide to using Trezor with Bitcoin Core (HWI)

This is a guide to using your Trezor with Bitcoin Core. It may seem like more trouble than it's worth but many applications use Bitcoin Core as a wallet such as LND, EPS, and JoinMarket. Learning how to integrate your Trezor into a Bitcoin Core install is rather useful in many unexpected ways. I did this all through the QT interfaces, but it's simple to script. There is a much simpler guide available from the HWI github, and the smallest Linux TLDR is here
Unfortunately, I don't have access to a Coldcard or Ledger. I'm not sure how the setpin or -stdinpass parameters are handled on that HW.

( A ) Install TrezorCTL, HWI, and build GUI

You only need to set the wallet up once, but may repeat to upgrade

( A.I ) Download extract and install HWI

  1. Download and isntall Python
  2. Download https://github.com/bitcoin-core/HWI/archive/1.1.2.zip
  3. Extract it to a working folder (assumes C:\User\Reddit\src\HWI)
  4. Change Directory (cd) to working folder cd "C:\User\Reddit\src\HWI"
  5. Setup venv python -m venv .venv
  6. Enter venv .venv\Scripts\activate.bat 1
  7. Install dependencies python -m pip install -U setuptools pip wheel
  8. Install TrezorCTL python -m pip install trezor[hidapi]
  9. Install HWI python -m pip install hwi pyside2
  10. Download github.com/libusb/libusb/releases/download/v1.0.23/libusb-1.0.23.7z
  11. Extract MS64\dll\libusb-1.0.dll from the archive
  12. Copy to pywin copy libusb-1.0.dll .venv\Lib\site-packages\pywin32_system32\

( A.II ) Build the QT UI files

  1. Download and install MSYS2
  2. Launch a mingw64.exe shell
  3. CD to working folder cd "C:\User\Reddit\src\HWI"
  4. Enter venv source .venv/Scripts/activate 1
  5. Run UI build bash contrib/generate-ui.sh

( B ) Create a Trezor wallet in Bitcoin Core (testnet)

You only need to set the wallet up once, no private key data is stored, only xpub data

( B.I ) Retrieve keypool from HWI-QT

  1. Launch hwi-qt.exe --testnet (assuming testnet)
  2. Click Set passphrase (if needed) to cache your passphrase then click Refresh
  3. Select you trezor from the list then click Set Pin (if needed)
  4. Ensure your Trezor in the dropdown has a fingerprint
  5. Select Change keypool options and choose P2WPKH
  6. Copy all the text from the Keypool textbox

( B.II ) Create the wallet in Bitcoin QT

  1. Launch Bitcoin Core (testnet) (non-pruned) 2
  2. Select Console from the Window menu
  3. Create a wallet createwallet "hwi" true
  4. Ensure that hwi is selected in the console wallet dropdown
  5. Verify walletname using the getwalletinfo command
  6. Import keypool importmulti '' (note ' caging)
  7. Rescan if TXNs are missing rescanblockchain 3

( C.I ) Grab Tesnet coins

  1. Select the Receive tab in Bitcoin Core (testnet)
  2. Ensure that the Wallet dropdown has hwi selected
  3. Select Create new receiving address and copy address
  4. Google "bitcoin testnet faucet" and visit a few sites
  5. Answer captcha and input your addressed copied from C.I.3

( D ) Spending funds with HWI

This is how you can spend funds in your Trezor using Bitcoin Core (testnet)

( D.I ) Create an unsigned PSBT

  1. Select the Send tab in Bitcoin Core (testnet)
  2. Ensure that the Wallet dropdown has hwi selected
  3. Verify your balance in Watch-only balance
  4. Rescan if balance is wrong (see B.II.7) 3
  5. Craft your TXN as usual, then click Create Unsigned
  6. Copy the PSBT to your clipboard when prompted

( D.II ) Sign your PSBT

  1. In HWI-QT click Sign PSBT
  2. Paste what you copied in D.I.6 in PSBT to Sign field
  3. Click Sign PSBT
  4. Copy the text for PSBT Result

( D.III ) Broadcast your TXN

  1. Select the Console window in Bitcoin Core (testnet)
  2. Ensure that the Wallet dropdown has hwi selected
  3. Finalize PSBT: finalizepsbt
  4. Copy the signed TXN hex from the hex field returned
  5. Broadcast TXN: sendrawtransaction

Final Thoughts

I did this all through the GUI interfaces for the benefit of the Windows users. Windows console is fine, but the quote escaping in windows console is nightmarish. Powershell would be good, but that throws this on a whole another level for most Windows folks.
There is also the need to use HWI-QT due to a bug in blank passphrases on the commandline. You can work around it by toggling passphrase off or on, but again, it's more than I wanted to spell out.
Footnotes:
  • 1. - Later version of python put the activate script under 'bin' instead of 'Script'
  • 2. - You can run pruned, but you need to have a fresh wallet
  • 3. - Rescan is automatic on 'importmulti' but I was pruned so it was wierd
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Getting started as a bitcoin cash merchant

So I've spent some time looking into various APIs and services, trying to get a basic merchant setup working usable for development, with a working testnet. The quality of the services offered and documentation is lacking, to say the least.
So I've taken a step back and decided I would try to get this working from "first principles", basically setting up a node and using the related APIs. I first tried the BCHD node which was looking promising, until the testnet version of it got into a loop where it kept complaining about some invalid transactions over and over and never seemed to recover.
The I tried "Bitcoin Cash Node", which is an awful name for search engines btw. It could really need a more unique and searchable name. After some struggle and careful reading of startup options and configuration files, I managed to get nodes up an running (testnet and mainnet) and in such a state that they answer to REST and JSONRPC calls.
I have transferred some bitcoin on testnet to a know address, using a public "faucet" that works (also a bit hard to find). I know that I managed to get that part working, as I've successfully looked up the balance of that address using a few of the public blockchain lookup tools.
What I havent' quite figured out is how to look up that address on my locally running node. Most of the API deals with transactions, not addresses. There aren't many APIs that accept addresses. scantxoutset might work, but it uses terms as "scan", which indicates it's not a "low cost" operation (which I would expect).
So I'm wondering, does this really mean that most bitcoin nodes really isn't usable for looking up addresses?? Or to turn it around, can anybody recommend bitcoin cash nodes that offers an easy to use API for looking up payment related things, like addresses?
Final note, I know how wallets etc work. The reason I'm trying to implement similar functionality from scratch is to understand all the details. And because a merchant typically can't just accept the current limited functionality with wallets, which seems focused on a single user's need, not what a merchant would need (gap issue etc).
And fwiw, I've also tested the "bitbox" API (which does not have a working testnet) and "fullstack" API (which has a working testnet, although documentation isn't complete). So I know about other ways of doing similar stuff. I'm just trying to minimize the number of external things I need to depend on while also figuring out how this can be done straight from running nodes.
submitted by kjeldahl to btc [link] [comments]

Ethereum Price Prediction 2021

Ethereum Price Prediction 2021
What is Ethereum (ETH)?
Ethereum is a global, open-source distributed computing platform based on blockchain technology with smart contracts functionality. The main feature of the platform that it is allows developers to build and launch decentralized applications. The Ethereum project was originally created by Vitalik Buterin and launched in 2015.
by StealthEX
Ethereum has its own internal cryptocurrency called Ether (ETH) which serves as means of payment as well as fueling and securing the Ethereum network.
Nowadays Ethereum is the world’s leading programmable blockchain. Thousands of DApps already created on the basis of Ethereum blockchain technology. Ethereum is also the second digital currency by market capitalization after Bitcoin.

Ethereum future plans and achievements

Recently the project has the following main updates and news:
• Ethereum celebrated the fifth anniversary.
• Medalla testnet was launched.
• The developers redesigned Ethereum’s website and added some fresh illustrations.
• The Ethereum team launched a new framework that will help users and developers.
• Ethereum.org was translated into 30 languages.
• Spadina Launchpad was announced.
• EIP 2982: Serenity Phase 0 was released.
• Zinken – eth2 testnet was announced.
In the near future, the Ethereum team will continue working on the launch of Ethereum 2.0. According to the project official roadmap, Eth2 is a long-planned upgrade to the Ethereum network, giving it the scalability and security it needs to serve all of humanity.

Ethereum Price History

Source: CoinMarketCap, Data was taken on 22 October 2020.
Current Price $397.99
Market Cap $44,784,928,052
Volume (24h) $18,038,603,226
Market Rank #2
Circulating Supply 113,094,863 ETH
Total Supply 113,094,863 ETH
7 Day High / Low $400.63 / $362.60

Experts Ethereum Price Predictions

Alexis Ohanian, Reddit co-founder

Back in 2018, Alexis Ohanian predicted a very optimistic future of cryptocurrencies. He thinks that Ether price will hit $1,500.

Simon Dedic, BlockFyre CEO

The famous investment expert Simon Dedic thinks that in the future the Ethereum price will go up and reach the mark of $9,000.

Nigel Green, deVere Group CEO

Nigel Green is sure that due to the increasing number of Ethereum technology adoption, Ether price will grow to $2,500 per coin in the near 4-6 months.

Brian Schuster, Ark Capital founder

Mr. Schuster expects that by the year 2024, the Ethereum cryptocurrency price will hit $100,000 per coin.

Ethereum Technical Analysis

Source: Tradingview, Data was taken on 22 October 2020

Ethereum Price Predictions

TradingBeasts Ether forecast

TradingBeasts analytics thinks that by the end of December 2020 ETH price will be $335.386 (-15.52%) per coin. At the end of the year 2021, the maximum ETH cryptocurrency price will reach $487.857 (+22.89%), while its average price will stay around $390.286 (-1.69%).

Wallet Investor ETH price prediction

According to the Wallet Investor Forecast System, ETH is a good long-term investment. By the end of December 2020, Ethereum may hit a maximum price of $603.739 (+52.08%) while its average price will stay around the mark of $462.435 (+16.48%). By the end of 2021, Ethereum’s average price is expected to be $534.109 per coin (+34.54%).

DigitalCoinPrice Ether price prediction

Based on DigitalCoinPrice forecast Ethereum is a beneficial investment. The ETH average price may hit the mark of $820.37 (+106.64%) by the end of December 2020. While by end of the next year its average price will be around $958.69 (+141.48%).

Longforecast ETH coin price prediction

According to Longforecast analyses, ETH crypto may reach $432 (+8.82%) per coin by the end of December 2020. By the end of 2021, the Ether price may reach $566 (+42.57%) per coin.
As you can see there are a lot of Ethereum forecasts, but no one knows for 100% what will happen with its price. One thing is for sure – if you are looking for the best platform to exchange cryptocurrency – StealthEX is here for you.

How to buy Ethereum at StealthEX

ETH is available for exchange on StealthEX with a low fee. Follow these easy steps:
✔ Choose the pair and the amount for your exchange. For example, BTC to ETH.
✔ Press the “Start exchange” button.
✔ Provide the recipient address to which the coins will be transferred.
✔ Move your cryptocurrency for the exchange.
✔ Receive your ETH coins!
Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get StealthEX.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us via [email protected]
The views and opinions expressed here are solely those of the author. Every investment and trading move involves risk. You should conduct your own research when making a decision.
Original article was posted on https://stealthex.io/blog/2020/10/22/ethereum-price-prediction-2021/
submitted by Stealthex_io to StealthEX [link] [comments]

Cardano Weekly Discussion and Question Thread - February 03, 2020

Hello everyone,
Welcome to the Cardano Weekly Discussion and Question Thread, a place where all things crypto can be discussed and asked on a weekly basis!
Rules:
Note: Questions collected will be summarized and answered at the end of the month. Please be aware that it can take some time to get questions answered. Thank you for understanding.
submitted by AutoModerator to cardano [link] [comments]

Power of the Command Line (bitcoin-cli, hwi, electrum, trezorctl)

I think some of the console tools available with HW wallets today are greatly under utilized. Here's a quick write-up on how to create and sign a TXN very similar to 43d27...1fc06 found on the SLIP-14 wallet. I'll be using TrezorCTL, Electrum, and HWI for the signing. I won't go much into the setup or install, but feel free to ask if you have questions about it. Note, you don't have to use all three of these. Any one will produce a valid signed TXN for broadcast. I just showed how to do it three ways. Whats more some of the Electrum and HWI steps are interchangeable.

TrezorCTL

This is the what most would think of to use to craft and sign TXNs, and is definitely very simple. The signing uses a script called build_tx.py to create a JSON file that is then used by the btc sign-tx command. The whole process is basically:
  1. tools/build_tx.py | trezorctl btc sign-tx -
This just means, take the output of build_tx and sign it. To copy 43d27...1fc06, I wrote a small script to feed build_tx, so my process looks like:
  1. ~/input.sh | tools/build_tx.py | trezorctl btc sign-tx -
But it's all very simple. Note... I used TrezorCTL v0.12.2 but build_tx.py version 0.13.0 1.

input.sh

```

!/bin/bash

secho() { sleep 1; echo $*}
secho "Testnet" # coin name secho "tbtc1.trezor.io" # blockbook server and outpoint (below) secho "e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00:0" secho "m/84'/1'/0'/0/0" # prev_out derivation to signing key secho "4294967293" # Sequence for RBF; hex(-3) secho "segwit" # Signature type on prev_out to use secho "" # NACK to progress to outs secho "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3" # out[0].addr secho "10000000" # out[1].amt secho "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu" # out[1].addr secho "20000000" # out[1].amt secho "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x" # out[2].addr secho "99999694" # out[2].amt secho "" # NACK to progress to change secho "" # NACK to skip change secho "2" # txn.version secho "0" # txn.locktime ```

Electrum

Electrum is one of the better GUI wallets available, but it also has a pretty good console interface. Like before you need your Trezor with the SLIP-14 wallet loaded and paired to Electrum. I'll assume Electrum is up and running with the Trezor wallet loaded to make things simple.
Like with TrezorCTL, Electrum feeds on a JSON file, but unlike TrezorCTL it needs that JSON squished into the command line. This is a simple sed command, but I won't bore you with the details, but just assume that's done. So the process in Electrum (v4.0.3) looks like:
  1. electrum serialize (create psbt to sign)
  2. electrum --wallet signtransaction (sign said psbt)
Still pretty simple right! Below is the JSON I smushed for #1

txn.json

{ "inputs": [{ "prevout_hash":"e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00", "prevout_n": 0, "value_sats": 129999867 }], "outputs": [{ "address": "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3", "value_sats": 10000000 },{ "address": "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu", "value_sats": 20000000 },{ "address": "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x", "value_sats": 99999694 }]}

HWI

HWI is an unsung hero in my book. It's a very small clean and simple interface between HW wallets and Bitcoin Core. It currently supports a good range of HW wallets. It keeps itself narrowly focused on TXN signing and offloads most everything else to Bitcoin Core. Again, I'll assume you've imported your Trezor keypool into Core and done the requisite IBD and rescan. And if you don't have the RPC enabled, you can always clone these commands into the QT-console.
To sign our TXN in HWI (v1.1.2), we will first need to craft (and finalize) it in Bitcoin Core (0.21.1). Like in Electrum, we will have to use simple sed to smush some JSON into command arguments, but I'll assume you have that covered. It will take an inputs.json and an outputs.json named separately.
  1. bitcoin-cli createpsbt (create psbt)
  2. bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet= walletprocesspsbt (process psbt)
  3. hwi -f signtx (sign psbt)
  4. bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet= finalizepsbt (get a signed TXN from psbt)
A little more involved, but still nothing too bad. Plus this gives you the full power of Bitcoin Core including integrations with LND (lightning).

inputs.json

[{ "txid": "e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00", "vout": 0 }]

outputs.json

[{ "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3": 0.10000000 },{ "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu": 0.20000000 },{ "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x": 0.99999694 }]

Conclusion

This may all seem like very low level coding, but is surprisingly simple once you get a knack for it. Whats more, all these platforms support testnet which allows you to practice with valueless coins until you get the hang of it. And, like many things in bitcoin, this is all (mostly) python, which is one of the easier languages to learn.
Enjoy
Footnotes
1 - https://github.com/trezotrezor-firmware/issues/1296
submitted by brianddk to TREZOR [link] [comments]

Scaling Reddit Community Points with Arbitrum Rollup: a piece of cake

Scaling Reddit Community Points with Arbitrum Rollup: a piece of cake
https://preview.redd.it/b80c05tnb9e51.jpg?width=2550&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=850282c1a3962466ed44f73886dae1c8872d0f31
Submitted for consideration to The Great Reddit Scaling Bake-Off
Baked by the pastry chefs at Offchain Labs
Please send questions or comments to [[email protected] ](mailto:[email protected])
1. Overview
We're excited to submit Arbitrum Rollup for consideration to The Great Reddit Scaling Bake-Off. Arbitrum Rollup is the only Ethereum scaling solution that supports arbitrary smart contracts without compromising on Ethereum's security or adding points of centralization. For Reddit, this means that Arbitrum can not only scale the minting and transfer of Community Points, but it can foster a creative ecosystem built around Reddit Community Points enabling points to be used in a wide variety of third party applications. That's right -- you can have your cake and eat it too!
Arbitrum Rollup isn't just Ethereum-style. Its Layer 2 transactions are byte-for-byte identical to Ethereum, which means Ethereum users can continue to use their existing addresses and wallets, and Ethereum developers can continue to use their favorite toolchains and development environments out-of-the-box with Arbitrum. Coupling Arbitrum’s tooling-compatibility with its trustless asset interoperability, Reddit not only can scale but can onboard the entire Ethereum community at no cost by giving them the same experience they already know and love (well, certainly know).
To benchmark how Arbitrum can scale Reddit Community Points, we launched the Reddit contracts on an Arbitrum Rollup chain. Since Arbitrum provides full Solidity support, we didn't have to rewrite the Reddit contracts or try to mimic their functionality using an unfamiliar paradigm. Nope, none of that. We launched the Reddit contracts unmodified on Arbitrum Rollup complete with support for minting and distributing points. Like every Arbitrum Rollup chain, the chain included a bridge interface in which users can transfer Community Points or any other asset between the L1 and L2 chains. Arbitrum Rollup chains also support dynamic contract loading, which would allow third-party developers to launch custom ecosystem apps that integrate with Community Points on the very same chain that runs the Reddit contracts.
1.1 Why Ethereum
Perhaps the most exciting benefit of distributing Community Points using a blockchain is the ability to seamlessly port points to other applications and use them in a wide variety of contexts. Applications may include simple transfers such as a restaurant that allows Redditors to spend points on drinks. Or it may include complex smart contracts -- such as placing Community Points as a wager for a multiparty game or as collateral in a financial contract.
The common denominator between all of the fun uses of Reddit points is that it needs a thriving ecosystem of both users and developers, and the Ethereum blockchain is perhaps the only smart contract platform with significant adoption today. While many Layer 1 blockchains boast lower cost or higher throughput than the Ethereum blockchain, more often than not, these attributes mask the reality of little usage, weaker security, or both.
Perhaps another platform with significant usage will rise in the future. But today, Ethereum captures the mindshare of the blockchain community, and for Community Points to provide the most utility, the Ethereum blockchain is the natural choice.
1.2 Why Arbitrum
While Ethereum's ecosystem is unmatched, the reality is that fees are high and capacity is too low to support the scale of Reddit Community Points. Enter Arbitrum. Arbitrum Rollup provides all of the ecosystem benefits of Ethereum, but with orders of magnitude more capacity and at a fraction of the cost of native Ethereum smart contracts. And most of all, we don't change the experience from users. They continue to use the same wallets, addresses, languages, and tools.
Arbitrum Rollup is not the only solution that can scale payments, but it is the only developed solution that can scale both payments and arbitrary smart contracts trustlessly, which means that third party users can build highly scalable add-on apps that can be used without withdrawing money from the Rollup chain. If you believe that Reddit users will want to use their Community Points in smart contracts--and we believe they will--then it makes the most sense to choose a single scaling solution that can support the entire ecosystem, eliminating friction for users.
We view being able to run smart contracts in the same scaling solution as fundamentally critical since if there's significant demand in running smart contracts from Reddit's ecosystem, this would be a load on Ethereum and would itself require a scaling solution. Moreover, having different scaling solutions for the minting/distribution/spending of points and for third party apps would be burdensome for users as they'd have to constantly shuffle their Points back and forth.
2. Arbitrum at a glance
Arbitrum Rollup has a unique value proposition as it offers a combination of features that no other scaling solution achieves. Here we highlight its core attributes.
Decentralized. Arbitrum Rollup is as decentralized as Ethereum. Unlike some other Layer 2 scaling projects, Arbitrum Rollup doesn't have any centralized components or centralized operators who can censor users or delay transactions. Even in non-custodial systems, centralized components provide a risk as the operators are generally incentivized to increase their profit by extracting rent from users often in ways that severely degrade user experience. Even if centralized operators are altruistic, centralized components are subject to hacking, coercion, and potential liability.
Massive Scaling. Arbitrum achieves order of magnitude scaling over Ethereum's L1 smart contracts. Our software currently supports 453 transactions-per-second for basic transactions (at 1616 Ethereum gas per tx). We have a lot of room left to optimize (e.g. aggregating signatures), and over the next several months capacity will increase significantly. As described in detail below, Arbitrum can easily support and surpass Reddit's anticipated initial load, and its capacity will continue to improve as Reddit's capacity needs grow.
Low cost. The cost of running Arbitrum Rollup is quite low compared to L1 Ethereum and other scaling solutions such as those based on zero-knowledge proofs. Layer 2 fees are low, fixed, and predictable and should not be overly burdensome for Reddit to cover. Nobody needs to use special equipment or high-end machines. Arbitrum requires validators, which is a permissionless role that can be run on any reasonable on-line machine. Although anybody can act as a validator, in order to protect against a “tragedy of the commons” and make sure reputable validators are participating, we support a notion of “invited validators” that are compensated for their costs. In general, users pay (low) fees to cover the invited validators’ costs, but we imagine that Reddit may cover this cost for its users. See more on the costs and validator options below.
Ethereum Developer Experience. Not only does Arbitrum support EVM smart contracts, but the developer experience is identical to that of L1 Ethereum contracts and fully compatible with Ethereum tooling. Developers can port existing Solidity apps or write new ones using their favorite and familiar toolchains (e.g. Truffle, Buidler). There are no new languages or coding paradigms to learn.
Ethereum wallet compatibility. Just as in Ethereum, Arbitrum users need only hold keys, but do not have to store any coin history or additional data to protect or access their funds. Since Arbitrum transactions are semantically identical to Ethereum L1 transactions, existing Ethereum users can use their existing Ethereum keys with their existing wallet software such as Metamask.
Token interoperability. Users can easily transfer their ETH, ERC-20 and ERC-721 tokens between Ethereum and the Arbitrum Rollup chain. As we explain in detail below, it is possible to mint tokens in L2 that can subsequently be withdrawn and recognized by the L1 token contract.
Fast finality. Transactions complete with the same finality time as Ethereum L1 (and it's possible to get faster finality guarantees by trading away trust assumptions; see the Arbitrum Rollup whitepaper for details).
Non-custodial. Arbitrum Rollup is a non-custodial scaling solution, so users control their funds/points and neither Reddit nor anyone else can ever access or revoke points held by users.
Censorship Resistant. Since it's completely decentralized, and the Arbitrum protocol guarantees progress trustlessly, Arbitrum Rollup is just as censorship-proof as Ethereum.
Block explorer. The Arbitrum Rollup block explorer allows users to view and analyze transactions on the Rollup chain.
Limitations
Although this is a bake-off, we're not going to sugar coat anything. Arbitrum Rollup, like any Optimistic Rollup protocol, does have one limitation, and that's the delay on withdrawals.
As for the concrete length of the delay, we've done a good deal of internal modeling and have blogged about this as well. Our current modeling suggests a 3-hour delay is sufficient (but as discussed in the linked post there is a tradeoff space between the length of the challenge period and the size of the validators’ deposit).
Note that this doesn't mean that the chain is delayed for three hours. Arbitrum Rollup supports pipelining of execution, which means that validators can keep building new states even while previous ones are “in the pipeline” for confirmation. As the challenge delays expire for each update, a new state will be confirmed (read more about this here).
So activity and progress on the chain are not delayed by the challenge period. The only thing that's delayed is the consummation of withdrawals. Recall though that any single honest validator knows immediately (at the speed of L1 finality) which state updates are correct and can guarantee that they will eventually be confirmed, so once a valid withdrawal has been requested on-chain, every honest party knows that the withdrawal will definitely happen. There's a natural place here for a liquidity market in which a validator (or someone who trusts a validator) can provide withdrawal loans for a small interest fee. This is a no-risk business for them as they know which withdrawals will be confirmed (and can force their confirmation trustlessly no matter what anyone else does) but are just waiting for on-chain finality.
3. The recipe: How Arbitrum Rollup works
For a description of the technical components of Arbitrum Rollup and how they interact to create a highly scalable protocol with a developer experience that is identical to Ethereum, please refer to the following documents:
Arbitrum Rollup Whitepaper
Arbitrum academic paper (describes a previous version of Arbitrum)
4. Developer docs and APIs
For full details about how to set up and interact with an Arbitrum Rollup chain or validator, please refer to our developer docs, which can be found at https://developer.offchainlabs.com/.
Note that the Arbitrum version described on that site is older and will soon be replaced by the version we are entering in Reddit Bake-Off, which is still undergoing internal testing before public release.
5. Who are the validators?
As with any Layer 2 protocol, advancing the protocol correctly requires at least one validator (sometimes called block producers) that is honest and available. A natural question is: who are the validators?
Recall that the validator set for an Arbitrum chain is open and permissionless; anyone can start or stop validating at will. (A useful analogy is to full nodes on an L1 chain.) But we understand that even though anyone can participate, Reddit may want to guarantee that highly reputable nodes are validating their chain. Reddit may choose to validate the chain themselves and/or hire third-party validators.To this end, we have begun building a marketplace for validator-for-hire services so that dapp developers can outsource validation services to reputable nodes with high up-time. We've announced a partnership in which Chainlink nodes will provide Arbitrum validation services, and we expect to announce more partnerships shortly with other blockchain infrastructure providers.
Although there is no requirement that validators are paid, Arbitrum’s economic model tracks validators’ costs (e.g. amount of computation and storage) and can charge small fees on user transactions, using a gas-type system, to cover those costs. Alternatively, a single party such as Reddit can agree to cover the costs of invited validators.
6. Reddit Contract Support
Since Arbitrum contracts and transactions are byte-for-byte compatible with Ethereum, supporting the Reddit contracts is as simple as launching them on an Arbitrum chain.
Minting. Arbitrum Rollup supports hybrid L1/L2 tokens which can be minted in L2 and then withdrawn onto the L1. An L1 contract at address A can make a special call to the EthBridge which deploys a "buddy contract" to the same address A on an Arbitrum chain. Since it's deployed at the same address, users can know that the L2 contract is the authorized "buddy" of the L1 contract on the Arbitrum chain.
For minting, the L1 contract is a standard ERC-20 contract which mints and burns tokens when requested by the L2 contract. It is paired with an ERC-20 contract in L2 which mints tokens based on whatever programmer provided minting facility is desired and burns tokens when they are withdrawn from the rollup chain. Given this base infrastructure, Arbitrum can support any smart contract based method for minting tokens in L2, and indeed we directly support Reddit's signature/claim based minting in L2.
Batch minting. What's better than a mint cookie? A whole batch! In addition to supporting Reddit’s current minting/claiming scheme, we built a second minting design, which we believe outperforms the signature/claim system in many scenarios.
In the current system, Reddit periodically issues signed statements to users, who then take those statements to the blockchain to claim their tokens. An alternative approach would have Reddit directly submit the list of users/amounts to the blockchain and distribute the tokens to the users without the signature/claim process.
To optimize the cost efficiency of this approach, we designed an application-specific compression scheme to minimize the size of the batch distribution list. We analyzed the data from Reddit's previous distributions and found that the data is highly compressible since token amounts are small and repeated, and addresses appear multiple times. Our function groups transactions by size, and replaces previously-seen addresses with a shorter index value. We wrote client code to compress the data, wrote a Solidity decompressing function, and integrated that function into Reddit’s contract running on Arbitrum.
When we ran the compression function on the previous Reddit distribution data, we found that we could compress batched minting data down to to 11.8 bytes per minting event (averaged over a 6-month trace of Reddit’s historical token grants)compared with roughly 174 bytes of on-chain data needed for the signature claim approach to minting (roughly 43 for an RLP-encoded null transaction + 65 for Reddit's signature + 65 for the user's signature + roughly 8 for the number of Points) .
The relative benefit of the two approaches with respect to on-chain call data cost depends on the percentage of users that will actually claim their tokens on chain. With the above figures, batch minting will be cheaper if roughly 5% of users redeem their claims. We stress that our compression scheme is not Arbitrum-specific and would be beneficial in any general-purpose smart contract platform.
8. Benchmarks and costs
In this section, we give the full costs of operating the Reddit contracts on an Arbitrum Rollup chain including the L1 gas costs for the Rollup chain, the costs of computation and storage for the L2 validators as well as the capital lockup requirements for staking.
Arbitrum Rollup is still on testnet, so we did not run mainnet benchmarks. Instead, we measured the L1 gas cost and L2 workload for Reddit operations on Arbitrum and calculated the total cost assuming current Ethereum gas prices. As noted below in detail, our measurements do not assume that Arbitrum is consuming the entire capacity of Ethereum. We will present the details of our model now, but for full transparency you can also play around with it yourself and adjust the parameters, by copying the spreadsheet found here.
Our cost model is based on measurements of Reddit’s contracts, running unmodified (except for the addition of a batch minting function) on Arbitrum Rollup on top of Ethereum.
On the distribution of transactions and frequency of assertions. Reddit's instructions specify the following minimum parameters that submissions should support:
Over a 5 day period, your scaling PoC should be able to handle:
  • 100,000 point claims (minting & distributing points)
  • 25,000 subscriptions
  • 75,000 one-off points burning
  • 100,000 transfers
We provide the full costs of operating an Arbitrum Rollup chain with this usage under the assumption that tokens are minted or granted to users in batches, but other transactions are uniformly distributed over the 5 day period. Unlike some other submissions, we do not make unrealistic assumptions that all operations can be submitted in enormous batches. We assume that batch minting is done in batches that use only a few percent on an L1 block’s gas, and that other operations come in evenly over time and are submitted in batches, with one batch every five minutes to keep latency reasonable. (Users are probably already waiting for L1 finality, which takes at least that long to achieve.)
We note that assuming that there are only 300,000 transactions that arrive uniformly over the 5 day period will make our benchmark numbers lower, but we believe that this will reflect the true cost of running the system. To see why, say that batches are submitted every five minutes (20 L1 blocks) and there's a fixed overhead of c bytes of calldata per batch, the cost of which will get amortized over all transactions executed in that batch. Assume that each individual transaction adds a marginal cost of t. Lastly assume the capacity of the scaling system is high enough that it can support all of Reddit's 300,000 transactions within a single 20-block batch (i.e. that there is more than c + 300,000*t byes of calldata available in 20 blocks).
Consider what happens if c, the per-batch overhead, is large (which it is in some systems, but not in Arbitrum). In the scenario that transactions actually arrive at the system's capacity and each batch is full, then c gets amortized over 300,000 transactions. But if we assume that the system is not running at capacity--and only receives 300,000 transactions arriving uniformly over 5 days-- then each 20-block assertion will contain about 200 transactions, and thus each transaction will pay a nontrivial cost due to c.
We are aware that other proposals presented scaling numbers assuming that 300,000 transactions arrived at maximum capacity and was executed in a single mega-transaction, but according to our estimates, for at least one such report, this led to a reported gas price that was 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than it would have been assuming uniform arrival. We make more realistic batching assumptions, and we believe Arbitrum compares well when batch sizes are realistic.
Our model. Our cost model includes several sources of cost:
  • L1 gas costs: This is the cost of posting transactions as calldata on the L1 chain, as well as the overhead associated with each batch of transactions, and the L1 cost of settling transactions in the Arbitrum protocol.
  • Validator’s staking costs: In normal operation, one validator will need to be staked. The stake is assumed to be 0.2% of the total value of the chain (which is assumed to be $1 per user who is eligible to claim points). The cost of staking is the interest that could be earned on the money if it were not staked.
  • Validator computation and storage: Every validator must do computation to track the chain’s processing of transactions, and must maintain storage to keep track of the contracts’ EVM storage. The cost of computation and storage are estimated based on measurements, with the dollar cost of resources based on Amazon Web Services pricing.
It’s clear from our modeling that the predominant cost is for L1 calldata. This will probably be true for any plausible rollup-based system.
Our model also shows that Arbitrum can scale to workloads much larger than Reddit’s nominal workload, without exhausting L1 or L2 resources. The scaling bottleneck will ultimately be calldata on the L1 chain. We believe that cost could be reduced substantially if necessary by clever encoding of data. (In our design any compression / decompression of L2 transaction calldata would be done by client software and L2 programs, never by an L1 contract.)
9. Status of Arbitrum Rollup
Arbitrum Rollup is live on Ethereum testnet. All of the code written to date including everything included in the Reddit demo is open source and permissively licensed under the Apache V2 license. The first testnet version of Arbitrum Rollup was released on testnet in February. Our current internal version, which we used to benchmark the Reddit contracts, will be released soon and will be a major upgrade.
Both the Arbitrum design as well as the implementation are heavily audited by independent third parties. The Arbitrum academic paper was published at USENIX Security, a top-tier peer-reviewed academic venue. For the Arbitrum software, we have engaged Trail of Bits for a security audit, which is currently ongoing, and we are committed to have a clean report before launching on Ethereum mainnet.
10. Reddit Universe Arbitrum Rollup Chain
The benchmarks described in this document were all measured using the latest internal build of our software. When we release the new software upgrade publicly we will launch a Reddit Universe Arbitrum Rollup chain as a public demo, which will contain the Reddit contracts as well as a Uniswap instance and a Connext Hub, demonstrating how Community Points can be integrated into third party apps. We will also allow members of the public to dynamically launch ecosystem contracts. We at Offchain Labs will cover the validating costs for the Reddit Universe public demo.
If the folks at Reddit would like to evaluate our software prior to our public demo, please email us at [email protected] and we'd be more than happy to provide early access.
11. Even more scaling: Arbitrum Sidechains
Rollups are an excellent approach to scaling, and we are excited about Arbitrum Rollup which far surpasses Reddit's scaling needs. But looking forward to Reddit's eventual goal of supporting hundreds of millions of users, there will likely come a time when Reddit needs more scaling than any Rollup protocol can provide.
While Rollups greatly reduce costs, they don't break the linear barrier. That is, all transactions have an on-chain footprint (because all calldata must be posted on-chain), albeit a far smaller one than on native Ethereum, and the L1 limitations end up being the bottleneck for capacity and cost. Since Ethereum has limited capacity, this linear use of on-chain resources means that costs will eventually increase superlinearly with traffic.
The good news is that we at Offchain Labs have a solution in our roadmap that can satisfy this extreme-scaling setting as well: Arbitrum AnyTrust Sidechains. Arbitrum Sidechains are similar to Arbitrum Rollup, but deviate in that they name a permissioned set of validators. When a chain’s validators agree off-chain, they can greatly reduce the on-chain footprint of the protocol and require almost no data to be put on-chain. When validators can't reach unanimous agreement off-chain, the protocol reverts to Arbitrum Rollup. Technically, Arbitrum Sidechains can be viewed as a hybrid between state channels and Rollup, switching back and forth as necessary, and combining the performance and cost that state channels can achieve in the optimistic case, with the robustness of Rollup in other cases. The core technical challenge is how to switch seamlessly between modes and how to guarantee that security is maintained throughout.
Arbitrum Sidechains break through this linear barrier, while still maintaining a high level of security and decentralization. Arbitrum Sidechains provide the AnyTrust guarantee, which says that as long as any one validator is honest and available (even if you don't know which one will be), the L2 chain is guaranteed to execute correctly according to its code and guaranteed to make progress. Unlike in a state channel, offchain progress does not require unanimous consent, and liveness is preserved as long as there is a single honest validator.
Note that the trust model for Arbitrum Sidechains is much stronger than for typical BFT-style chains which introduce a consensus "voting" protocols among a small permissioned group of validators. BFT-based protocols require a supermajority (more than 2/3) of validators to agree. In Arbitrum Sidechains, by contrast, all you need is a single honest validator to achieve guaranteed correctness and progress. Notice that in Arbitrum adding validators strictly increases security since the AnyTrust guarantee provides correctness as long as any one validator is honest and available. By contrast, in BFT-style protocols, adding nodes can be dangerous as a coalition of dishonest nodes can break the protocol.
Like Arbitrum Rollup, the developer and user experiences for Arbitrum Sidechains will be identical to that of Ethereum. Reddit would be able to choose a large and diverse set of validators, and all that they would need to guarantee to break through the scaling barrier is that a single one of them will remain honest.
We hope to have Arbitrum Sidechains in production in early 2021, and thus when Reddit reaches the scale that surpasses the capacity of Rollups, Arbitrum Sidechains will be waiting and ready to help.
While the idea to switch between channels and Rollup to get the best of both worlds is conceptually simple, getting the details right and making sure that the switch does not introduce any attack vectors is highly non-trivial and has been the subject of years of our research (indeed, we were working on this design for years before the term Rollup was even coined).
12. How Arbitrum compares
We include a comparison to several other categories as well as specific projects when appropriate. and explain why we believe that Arbitrum is best suited for Reddit's purposes. We focus our attention on other Ethereum projects.
Payment only Rollups. Compared to Arbitrum Rollup, ZK-Rollups and other Rollups that only support token transfers have several disadvantages:
  • As outlined throughout the proposal, we believe that the entire draw of Ethereum is in its rich smart contracts support which is simply not achievable with today's zero-knowledge proof technology. Indeed, scaling with a ZK-Rollup will add friction to the deployment of smart contracts that interact with Community Points as users will have to withdraw their coins from the ZK-Rollup and transfer them to a smart contract system (like Arbitrum). The community will be best served if Reddit builds on a platform that has built-in, frictionless smart-contract support.
  • All other Rollup protocols of which we are aware employ a centralized operator. While it's true that users retain custody of their coins, the centralized operator can often profit from censoring, reordering, or delaying transactions. A common misconception is that since they're non-custodial protocols, a centralized sequencer does not pose a risk but this is incorrect as the sequencer can wreak havoc or shake down users for side payments without directly stealing funds.
  • Sidechain type protocols can eliminate some of these issues, but they are not trustless. Instead, they require trust in some quorum of a committee, often requiring two-third of the committee to be honest, compared to rollup protocols like Arbitrum that require only a single honest party. In addition, not all sidechain type protocols have committees that are diverse, or even non-centralized, in practice.
  • Plasma-style protocols have a centralized operator and do not support general smart contracts.
13. Concluding Remarks
While it's ultimately up to the judges’ palate, we believe that Arbitrum Rollup is the bakeoff choice that Reddit kneads. We far surpass Reddit's specified workload requirement at present, have much room to optimize Arbitrum Rollup in the near term, and have a clear path to get Reddit to hundreds of millions of users. Furthermore, we are the only project that gives developers and users the identical interface as the Ethereum blockchain and is fully interoperable and tooling-compatible, and we do this all without any new trust assumptions or centralized components.
But no matter how the cookie crumbles, we're glad to have participated in this bake-off and we thank you for your consideration.
About Offchain Labs
Offchain Labs, Inc. is a venture-funded New York company that spun out of Princeton University research, and is building the Arbitrum platform to usher in the next generation of scalable, interoperable, and compatible smart contracts. Offchain Labs is backed by Pantera Capital, Compound VC, Coinbase Ventures, and others.
Leadership Team
Ed Felten
Ed Felten is Co-founder and Chief Scientist at Offchain Labs. He is on leave from Princeton University, where he is the Robert E. Kahn Professor of Computer Science and Public Affairs. From 2015 to 2017 he served at the White House as Deputy United States Chief Technology Officer and senior advisor to the President. He is an ACM Fellow and member of the National Academy of Engineering. Outside of work, he is an avid runner, cook, and L.A. Dodgers fan.
Steven Goldfeder
Steven Goldfeder is Co-founder and Chief Executive Officer at Offchain Labs. He holds a PhD from Princeton University, where he worked at the intersection of cryptography and cryptocurrencies including threshold cryptography, zero-knowledge proof systems, and post-quantum signatures. He is a co-author of Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency Technologies, the leading textbook on cryptocurrencies, and he has previously worked at Google and Microsoft Research, where he co-invented the Picnic signature algorithm. When not working, you can find Steven spending time with his family, taking a nature walk, or twisting balloons.
Harry Kalodner
Harry Kalodner is Co-founder and Chief Technology Officer at Offchain Labs where he leads the engineering team. Before the company he attended Princeton as a Ph.D candidate where his research explored economics, anonymity, and incentive compatibility of cryptocurrencies, and he also has worked at Apple. When not up at 3:00am writing code, Harry occasionally sleeps.
submitted by hkalodner to ethereum [link] [comments]

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